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What stock to use


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#1 siddharth diwan

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Posted 01 March 2007 - 05:48 AM

I'm really confused in this matter please help me out.

What stock is used in Night Ext. day or tungston balanced?


If in a scene if characters are moving from Int with all day lights to Ext Night with tungston lighting then we use two different stock or what and what if this happens in a singe shot
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#2 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 01 March 2007 - 04:17 PM

I'm really confused in this matter please help me out.

What stock is used in Night Ext. day or tungston balanced?
If in a scene if characters are moving from Int with all day lights to Ext Night with tungston lighting then we use two different stock or what and what if this happens in a singe shot


In most cases, a tungsten balance film would be used for a night exterior with mixed building lighting, automobile headlights, and street lights in the scene.
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#3 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 01 March 2007 - 09:02 PM

If in a scene if characters are moving from Int with all day lights to Ext Night with tungston lighting then we use two different stock or what and what if this happens in a singe shot



You either use the stock for the predominat light, or you have to corect leter. Their are filter sheets made that somtimes are put on windows to make them tengsten compatible.. Think of a 85 filter but controling the dyslight.

If you have someone walking from an interior to exterior in daylight, you may find it expedient to use some HMI lights to light your interious and use day film, or an 85. Likewise you may want to filter your HMI lights when the cahracher is walking out into a tungsten lit exterior.

Worse case is you filter half and half, and the colourist/timer has to make a correction in mid scene. In that case a cutaway can be a lifesaver.
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#4 Jon Kukla

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Posted 04 March 2007 - 03:48 PM

Int. with day lights to Ext. Night with tungsten lights? I'm confused about what you mean by that. If you mean Int. with daylight-balanced HMIs, then you can gel them to CTO to match.

This all being said, you don't have to align all your light sources to the same color temperature, nor do they have to match the film's color temperature. The important thing is that you know what sort of effect you will get. It's not uncommon, for instance, to only partially correct sunlight coming in to an Int. Day shot otherwise lit by tungstens, in order to give a stronger impression of the daylight. It just depends on what you want to achieve.

For instance, I lit a short a few months back where I had a lot of big windows (and no budget to gel them), small and weak tungsten practicals, and my own lights which I wasn't crazy about CTB'ing and losing lots of light output. My solution was to 1/2 CTB my lights, leave the practicals and the windows uncorrected, and add an 81EF filter (that's a half correction to tungsten balance) to the camera. This had the effect of making my lights white, the daylight from the windows only slighly blue, and my practicals slightly warm.
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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

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Broadcast Solutions Inc

Ritter Battery

Opal

The Slider

Aerial Filmworks

Technodolly

Willys Widgets

Glidecam