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#1 Matthew Buick

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Posted 03 March 2007 - 07:51 PM

A while back on eBay I saw a full lenght Super 8mm print of Grease. :)

I was wondering what the print stock would have been, it is the holy 5247, or an impostor?

Kind regards. :D
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 03 March 2007 - 11:32 PM

A while back on eBay I saw a full lenght Super 8mm print of Grease. :)

I was wondering what the print stock would have been, it is the holy 5247, or an impostor?

Kind regards. :D


What difference would it make, unless it is a 35mm anamorphic print, it's not going to tell you much about the look of 5247 in the original "Grease" -- just the look of an optical printer reduction from dupe elements. So unless you were planning to do the same thing -- shoot in 35mm anamorphic and reduce to Super-8, I don't think you'll gain any insights into how 5247 looks. Certainly the grain would be a lot different than if you shot 5247 in Super-8 to begin with.
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#3 ryan_bennett

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Posted 04 March 2007 - 12:18 AM

Matthew once again what makes the colors, the film stock or the decisions of the you make in the colors used in the scene you're filming? Certainly there's a degree thatt the film stock effects the colors, but what you have on your actors, the background etc. that's all on set in camera, plus you can manipulate colors, saturate or desaturate in post.

Have you looked at these links? :
http://www.kodak.com...tive/5247.shtml

Learn how to read curves to find a stock that matches it the closest.

5247 is a 125 speed stock, fuji currently has a 125:

http://www.fujifilmu...roduct=41075313

I wouldn't be surprised if what you saw was actually a 16mm print or a 5 minute or so "teaser"/compliation reel on super 8 and not 5247, not the whole movie, something not unlike this:

http://cgi.ebay.com/...1QQcmdZViewItem

Even though it would be super 8 that would be a whole buttload of reels and super 8, 2200 feet of film for a 110 minute movie...

Shoot, learn, experiment, shoot and learn and just keep repeating. You'll get the look you want but you need to learn and fail/succeed a few times. It's not the stock, it's not the cameram, it's what you do with them and what you capture using these tools.
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#4 Chris Cottrill

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Posted 04 March 2007 - 07:10 AM

I wouldn't be surprised if what you saw was actually a 16mm print or a 5 minute or so "teaser"/compliation reel on super 8 and not 5247, not the whole movie,

Even though it would be super 8 that would be a whole buttload of reels and super 8, 2200 feet of film for a 110 minute movie...


GREASE was sold in full feature form in Super-8 around 1980. It was sold by a company called Marketing Films which bought the rights to some Paramount titles. Not sure what stock was used in printing the reduction prints, but they were estar based. The prints were pretty good overall, with great sound on the magnetic stripe, but perhaps a tad soft on the sharpness. Most of them have some slight color fade by now. More recently (last few years) GREASE was sold by Derann Films in the U.K. (and may still be available) with new prints in full scope.
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#5 Matthew Buick

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Posted 04 March 2007 - 04:10 PM

I was only asking which film was used out of pure interest, not because I wanted to gauge colour and grain. :angry:

If I wanted to see what 5247 looked like in super 8 I would only have to find a piece of camera negative, cut out the right shape, film it in my camera, process it, and then have it "telecined" or converted to whichever positive would best suit it's look. :D
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#6 Joseph Winchester

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Posted 04 March 2007 - 04:45 PM

You would need to project it to see it's real characteristics. Telecine has it's own effects on the look of the film, and each telecine will be a bit different. So if you want a true test of the films 'look', projected is the only way to go.
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#7 Matthew Buick

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Posted 04 March 2007 - 04:54 PM

Oh. I thought some high quality device like a Workprinter XP wouldn't change the look too much. :huh:

Anyway there's no way I'm paying £250.00 just to see what 5247 looks like. :D
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#8 Terry Mester

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Posted 05 March 2007 - 01:08 AM

Oh. I thought some high quality device like a Workprinter XP wouldn't change the look too much. :huh:


Matthew, the colour content of a Digital Telecine record is no more than the "bits" of Computer Memory assigned to it. So, a 24-Bit colour record (8-Bits per Primary Colour -- R,G&B) can only record a maximum of 256 Shades per Primary Colour! However, this doesn't necessarily mean that the CCD Pixels in the Telecine machine can accurately produce all 256 different Shades. Furthermore, the Pixel Sensors are "square" and "linear" which distorts the original light record on the Film.
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#9 Matthew Buick

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Posted 05 March 2007 - 04:03 PM

Aha, you've just cleared some techno-jargon for me, thanks. :D
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