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Balancing Tungsten/Daylight when shooting for Black & White


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#1 Andy_Alderslade

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Posted 06 March 2007 - 05:17 PM

This might seem a bit obvious, but I'm shooting a short soon on colour negative to be turned black and white in post - and I was wondering if it was necessary to balance colour temperature of daylight and tungsten sources.

Presumably it doesn't matter if the colours vary as that won't show in the Black and White finish. Also as its not Black and White negative there won't be the problem of the film being more sensitive the blue/day-light.

The project is definetly finishing in Black and White.

Please let me know if you think I'm wrong, or i'm over simplifiing the issue.

Cheers, Andy
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#2 Rupe Whiteman

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Posted 06 March 2007 - 05:21 PM

This might seem a bit obvious, but I'm shooting a short soon on colour negative to be turned black and white in post - and I was wondering if it was necessary to balance colour temperature of daylight and tungsten sources.

Presumably it doesn't matter if the colours vary as that won't show in the Black and White finish. Also as its not Black and White negative there won't be the problem of the film being more sensitive the blue/day-light.

The project is definetly finishing in Black and White.

Please let me know if you think I'm wrong, or i'm over simplifiing the issue.

Cheers, Andy


you won't need to balance for daylight so you've got a bit of extra stop... But having said that you can also add an 85 to the camera to get silvery tones and richer blacks but you'll need to test carefully first...
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#3 K Borowski

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Posted 06 March 2007 - 06:25 PM

Doesn't matter if color matches are off, just make sure that one of your color layers isn't too underexposed. This probably means rating this stop maybe 1 stop slower than you normally would to give "healthy" exposure to the film.

Regards,

~Karl
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#4 James Brown

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Posted 09 March 2007 - 05:23 AM

Hi,

I recently did some INT/EXT tests on this with the 7218. In telecine i could not tell the difference between the corrected and uncorrected shots.
Shoot it clean. More Stop and nothing in front of the lens.

Cheers James.
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