Jump to content


Photo

Building This Rig


  • Please log in to reply
18 replies to this topic

#1 David Sweetman

David Sweetman
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 757 posts
  • Student

Posted 06 March 2007 - 08:40 PM

It seems so often on set I find myself wanting a backlight directly behind a subject, but can seldom hide or frame out the stand and light efficiently. So I'm thinking about building something like the following diagram, (which is not to scale - i'm not a mechanical drafter) and hanging the lightest 1-2k I can find from it, so that I can keep the two c-stands as far apart as possible while staying safe. Any suggestions or ideas on this?

Does something like this already exist for location shoots? I'd imagine it does - if so, what is it called?

Posted Image
  • 0

#2 chris kempinski

chris kempinski
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 75 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 06 March 2007 - 09:38 PM

It seems so often on set I find myself wanting a backlight directly behind a subject, but can seldom hide or frame out the stand and light efficiently. So I'm thinking about building something like the following diagram, (which is not to scale - i'm not a mechanical drafter) and hanging the lightest 1-2k I can find from it, so that I can keep the two c-stands as far apart as possible while staying safe. Any suggestions or ideas on this?

Does something like this already exist for location shoots? I'd imagine it does - if so, what is it called?

Posted Image



We call it a Goal Post. Others may have another name for it. You need a good sized piece of pipe and something a bit beefier than C-stands. you can get ears that will fit 2" pipe, normally for large 12X or 20X frames, then something like a hi-roller or hi-hi to hold the weight once it's in the air. I like hi-rollers cause the legs have a lower profile and you can move the entire rig somewhat easily.

cheers
chris
  • 0

#3 Troy Warr

Troy Warr
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 212 posts
  • Other
  • Austin, TX, USA

Posted 06 March 2007 - 09:57 PM

Hi David,

To me, it actually looks a lot like a background stand. Since they're meant to hold roll paper, I don't know if they'll support the weight of your light, but if you buy a fairly beefy one (and/or upgrade the horizontal pipe with a stronger one) you might be able to make it work. Roll paper can be pretty heavy, but since it's spread out on a long tube I don't think it would stress the crossbar as much as a light hanging from the center.

Best of luck!
  • 0

#4 Frank Barrera

Frank Barrera
  • Sustaining Members
  • 464 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, CA

Posted 06 March 2007 - 10:12 PM

It seems so often on set I find myself wanting a backlight directly behind a subject, but can seldom hide or frame out the stand and light efficiently. So I'm thinking about building something like the following diagram, (which is not to scale - i'm not a mechanical drafter) and hanging the lightest 1-2k I can find from it, so that I can keep the two c-stands as far apart as possible while staying safe. Any suggestions or ideas on this?

Does something like this already exist for location shoots? I'd imagine it does - if so, what is it called?

Posted Image

I'm sure there are grips here but you should post this over at the Grip Sub Forum anyway because that's where it belongs. In NYC it's called a goal post as well. The main variables with this rig are the length of pipe; the wieght of the unit(s) and the type of pipe (aluminum or steel). I find that these all change from location to location. But like I said you should talk to the grips.
  • 0

#5 Rob.m.Neilson

Rob.m.Neilson
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 78 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 06 March 2007 - 10:57 PM

I'm sure there are grips here but you should post this over at the Grip Sub Forum anyway because that's where it belongs. In NYC it's called a goal post as well. The main variables with this rig are the length of pipe; the wieght of the unit(s) and the type of pipe (aluminum or steel). I find that these all change from location to location. But like I said you should talk to the grips.



Why not take a polecat extend it and mount the ends in clamps on the c-stands? I've done this before also by using extra arms btw two stands in a pinch, but it made me really nervous!
  • 0

#6 Kevin Zanit

Kevin Zanit
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1223 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • LA

Posted 06 March 2007 - 11:10 PM

This is called a goal post, and there are a few ways to dit.

You can take a 12' piece of speed rail with ears on each side. You then use two high-rollers or combo stands with lollipops in them to support it.


Kevin Zanit
  • 0

#7 James Steven Beverly

James Steven Beverly
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4199 posts
  • Director
  • El Paso, Texas

Posted 07 March 2007 - 01:54 AM

I actually have something like that I built. I'll snap a few picks and post 'em. B)
  • 0

#8 Dan Salzmann

Dan Salzmann
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1143 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Paris, France

Posted 07 March 2007 - 03:07 AM

Why not use a boom?
  • 0

#9 chris kempinski

chris kempinski
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 75 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 07 March 2007 - 03:55 AM

Why not use a boom?


with a 2K?
that is more of a menace arm... and that is a grip thing.
you need a counter weight and cantilever. A goal post is
a better idea.
a menace arm works for kino or lighter lights.

Edited by chris kempinski, 07 March 2007 - 03:56 AM.

  • 0

#10 Michael Nash

Michael Nash
  • Sustaining Members
  • 3330 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Pasadena, CA

Posted 07 March 2007 - 04:00 AM

Do you really need a 2K for a backlight? Usually you can get away with something much smaller and lighter in practical locations, like a 650W Omni. A menace arm or even a double-armed C-stand can hold small lights like that.
  • 0

#11 Kevin Zanit

Kevin Zanit
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1223 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • LA

Posted 07 March 2007 - 04:45 AM

If all you need is a small light than you can what you said, but I've needed to goalpost things like a 12k PAR.goal_post.jpg
  • 0

#12 Luke Prendergast

Luke Prendergast
  • Sustaining Members
  • 491 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Victoria Australia

Posted 07 March 2007 - 06:20 AM

Hey Kevin, is that the the shot that cracked the windshield from thermal shock?
  • 0

#13 Kevin Zanit

Kevin Zanit
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1223 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • LA

Posted 07 March 2007 - 04:08 PM

Yep, good memory!
  • 0

#14 Jonathan Bowerbank

Jonathan Bowerbank
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2815 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • San Francisco, CA

Posted 07 March 2007 - 04:33 PM

I've used a goal post for lighting a green screen as well. Had a couple 1k floods hanging from the crossbar and a pair of nooks on the floor.

It came in handy because I was working in a very cramped classroom/studio environment, and needed to utilize the height of the room to keep the lighting pretty even across the greenscreen.

I also wanted to put a 650 up there for a backlight, but the gaffer who brought the equipment wasn't very secure about the rigging, so I had to settle for a rear quasi-45 degree backlight.

Just be sure your stands have wider legs to support them and that the stands themselves are pretty sturdy. There were a couple scares where we thought the thing was gonna come toppling down as a result of careless PA's scampering around the set.
  • 0

#15 amish

amish

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 04 August 2007 - 06:50 PM

Sounds like you need a Condor to me. ha, jk.
There's a hundred ways to do everything, polecats, menace arms, goalposts, wall spreaders, babyplates, ballons, whatever.
Most importantly :
IS IT SAFE?

Ever consider hiring a Grip?
We smell funny, but LOVE to rig stuff like this.
  • 0

#16 Jayson Crothers

Jayson Crothers
  • Sustaining Members
  • 351 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, CA

Posted 04 August 2007 - 07:36 PM

Amish! Welcome the site sir!
  • 0

#17 Bob Hayes

Bob Hayes
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1087 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Culver City, California

Posted 04 August 2007 - 10:47 PM

If all you need is a small light than you can what you said, but I've needed to goalpost things like a 12k PAR.goal_post.jpg


Kevin what was the need for such a large light so close to the car?
  • 0

#18 Kevin Zanit

Kevin Zanit
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1223 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • LA

Posted 04 August 2007 - 11:58 PM

It was a close up shot of the shift knob in the car at 1000fps (a water drop onto it).
  • 0

#19 Chris Walters

Chris Walters
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 82 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 07 August 2007 - 08:52 PM

It was a close up shot of the shift knob in the car at 1000fps (a water drop onto it).


I was gonna say kev 12k from 4 ft away seems a bit much lol, but if your going that fast i guess you would have to be a light hog
  • 0


Opal

Technodolly

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Visual Products

FJS International, LLC

Ritter Battery

Aerial Filmworks

CineLab

Abel Cine

Metropolis Post

The Slider

rebotnix Technologies

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Glidecam

Rig Wheels Passport

Paralinx LLC

Willys Widgets

Tai Audio

Wooden Camera

CineTape

Technodolly

CineTape

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Willys Widgets

Glidecam

Metropolis Post

The Slider

Ritter Battery

FJS International, LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Tai Audio

Wooden Camera

Paralinx LLC

CineLab

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Rig Wheels Passport

Visual Products

Aerial Filmworks

rebotnix Technologies

Abel Cine

Opal