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capture HD 4:2:2 FROM THE V-1


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#1 Ram Shani

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Posted 07 March 2007 - 10:10 AM

hi

i read the i can capture 4:2:2 HD from the v-1 using the HDMI jacket

but on what hardware i capture it

do i need laptop with Blackmagic HDMI card?

can i us Sony HDD?

or maybe us FireStore that i use on the HVX200?
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#2 Ram Shani

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Posted 07 March 2007 - 11:20 AM

what you think this will work????

http://www.amazon.co...r/dp/B000F4NNW8
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#3 Walter Graff

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Posted 07 March 2007 - 11:31 AM

The real question is do you need 4:2:2? People are under the notion that 4:2:2 is better than 4:1:1 or 4:2:0 bit unless you are doing very specific things with your final product, it matters little.
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#4 Ram Shani

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Posted 07 March 2007 - 02:31 PM

i need it for green screen work and i think it will work beater with color correction and after work right?

also its uncompressed

Edited by Ram Shani, 07 March 2007 - 02:32 PM.

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#5 Walter Graff

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Posted 07 March 2007 - 02:58 PM

Yes and no. Green is well represented in 4:1:1 and 4:2:0 because it is the reference channel. Really it is more about formats, camera CCD size, and editing techniques. As I say over an over in my instructional DV on green screen what's most important is for you to test it out lighting and cutting a green screen to understand the nuances of your particular set up. Most folks who have little experience with it simply try it for real first time around and get in trouble. Its the equivalent of getting a drivers license teh day before you enter a race. I would say a simple way for you to understand it better is to get a small piece of green and a stuffed animal. Light it, shoot it and then see what the possibilities are in post. Or make sure you hire someone to edit this that has green screen experience. I can't stress enough that cameras are tools and it's always the people that use the equipment that make it work well, not a format or type of camera.

Will you get a better Green screen signal off the HDMI outs and will it make a substantial difference. Not always. But I am imagining if you are not so well versed in green screen alone then you are not so well versed in how to use the HDMI output and connect it to a computer to record, so with that I'd say go the easier route. HDV records green screen perfectly fine. Post production is about 70% of successful green screen anyway so probably best to find someone that knows the ins and outs more than trying all these experiments in "better" with little technical experience.

While many complain about various cameras and green screen I have yet to find one that can't cut a great key. That is because its the person not the tool that does it properly

Another misconception is that green screen is perfect science. In most cases it is not. Unless you have an outboard device like ultimate cutting your key live with a trained tech running it, odds are good you will have the slightest of imperfections even with the best of set ups. It happens at every level of green screen.

On another board you asked the same question and added the question of digibeta. Digibeta will work great in situations where you don't want too many things to deal with with lack of the technical side. And digibeta can be uprezzed to HD and look just as good. Id say even better than a prosumer camera that shoots HD natively like the FX1.

Will you get a better Green screen signal off the HDMI outs and will it make a substantial difference. Not always. But I am imagining if you are not so well versed in green screen alone then you are not so well versed in how to use the HDMI output and connect it to a computer to record, so with that I'd say go the easier route. HDV records green screen perfectly fine. Post production is about 70% of successful green screen anyway so probalby best to find someone that knows the ins and outs more than trying all these experiments in "better" with little technical experience.

While many complain avbout various cameras and green screen I have yet ot find one that can't cut a great key. That is becuase its teh person not the tool that fdoes it properly

Another misconception is that green screen is perfect science. In most cases it is not. Unless you have an outboard device like ultimate cutting your key live with a trained tech running it, odds are good you will have the slightest of imperfections even with teh best of set ups. It happens at every level of green screen.


On another board you asked the same question and added the question of digibeta. Digibeta will work great in situations where you dont want too many things to deal with with lack of the technical side. And digibeta can be uprezzed to HD and look just as good. Id say even better than a prosumer camera that shoots HD natively like the FX1.
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#6 Ram Shani

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Posted 09 March 2007 - 07:33 AM

thanks for the answer

just to let you know i am well known with green screen since my days as gaffer

the misconception comes from the post people i worked with

but if you have a choose between v-1 and let say hvx200 with its hd

for green screen what would you chose?

i am no post expert but i think the more pic info you get out of the camera the better the post .

or maybe i m wrong???
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