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Slow motion shoot


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#1 lucas Loureiro

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Posted 07 March 2007 - 07:38 PM

I will be doing a shoot of a girl walking along a downtown street.
I wanted to have this girl to walk at normal speed and everyone else flying by quickly.
I was planning on shooting at 3 fps and having her walk 8 times as slow and try to time that with a stopwatch.
Does this seem suitable?
Would any one suggest any different speeds?
Would a 144 shutter angle help with the blurry fast speed effect?
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#2 Tim O'Connor

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Posted 08 March 2007 - 11:55 AM

I will be doing a shoot of a girl walking along a downtown street.
I wanted to have this girl to walk at normal speed and everyone else flying by quickly.
I was planning on shooting at 3 fps and having her walk 8 times as slow and try to time that with a stopwatch.
Does this seem suitable?
Would any one suggest any different speeds?
Would a 144 shutter angle help with the blurry fast speed effect?


She's still going to be sped up too but by slowing her down x8 that should put her in the
range of normal motion, one would hope, but to get her to look slow motion as in your
post title, you'd want to slow her down even more. The usual big problem is that when
doing this and attempting to make the girl look normal or slower than normal in a crowd
of everybody flying by is that the girl may appear to have jittery, jerky motions that look
unnatural.

If possible, maybe you can minimize her movement. Having her stand still may avoid you getting
busted when she walks like a marionette.

Also, maybe you could shoot her walking at 24 F.P.S. with cars flying by and then when she
stops switch to 3 F.P.S. and cue your pedestrians to walk through? Good luck.
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#3 lucas Loureiro

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Posted 08 March 2007 - 12:38 PM

She's still going to be sped up too but by slowing her down x8 that should put her in the
range of normal motion, one would hope, but to get her to look slow motion as in your
post title, you'd want to slow her down even more. The usual big problem is that when
doing this and attempting to make the girl look normal or slower than normal in a crowd
of everybody flying by is that the girl may appear to have jittery, jerky motions that look
unnatural.

If possible, maybe you can minimize her movement. Having her stand still may avoid you getting
busted when she walks like a marionette.

Also, maybe you could shoot her walking at 24 F.P.S. with cars flying by and then when she
stops switch to 3 F.P.S. and cue your pedestrians to walk through? Good luck.


That is very good advice.
I think her moving at apparent normal speed is going to be good enough for me.
She is a dancer and I have seen her walking very slow with out any abrupt movements.
I will try doing the ones with her standing still also.( with very short ends @ 3 FPS this will the cheapest project I have done :D).
What about the shutter angle?

Thank you for your reply Tim.

Edited by lucas Loureiro, 08 March 2007 - 12:40 PM.

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#4 boy yniguez

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Posted 09 March 2007 - 10:44 PM

That is very good advice.
I think her moving at apparent normal speed is going to be good enough for me.
She is a dancer and I have seen her walking very slow with out any abrupt movements.
I will try doing the ones with her standing still also.( with very short ends @ 3 FPS this will the cheapest project I have done :D).
What about the shutter angle?

Thank you for your reply Tim.

closing down your shutter would counteract any blurring you hoped for in the first place!
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#5 Patrick Cooper

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Posted 09 March 2007 - 11:25 PM

If you film this dancer woman standing still at 3 fps, I hope that there is no breeze blowing her hair or her clothing....though you never know, it could make an interesting (unintentional) effect.
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#6 lucas Loureiro

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Posted 10 March 2007 - 10:39 AM

closing down your shutter would counteract any blurring you hoped for in the first place!


Hello Boy

I agree with you. The smaller the shutter the less smooth the movement looks like(less blur).
I was thinking that because there is so much movement behind the subject, the choppiness would
give the image a perception of blur and help take down my light level with out the
need for much nd.
I know it sounds counter intuitive, but I was wondering if any one has done small shutter and
slow FPS. Any way I will do the shoot on 180 and try out smaller shutter and post the
results soon.

Lucas Loureiro

Edited by lucas Loureiro, 10 March 2007 - 10:40 AM.

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#7 Paul Bruening

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Posted 10 March 2007 - 08:16 PM

Green screen the girl separately at 24fps and post in DI.
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