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1000>100 reels


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#1 Dory Breaux DP

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Posted 08 March 2007 - 02:05 PM

I have a delema:
I am again considering getting a K-3, and have found a pretty good deal on 2000 feet of Kodak EXR 7386 in 1000 foot rolls. Needles to say those arnt daylight, and wouldnt fit the K-3. But, is there any way possible to cut individual 100 leingths to make them work with the K-3? If this is possible, is there any way to make daylight rolls?

Thanks so much,
Dory
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#2 Troy Warr

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Posted 08 March 2007 - 02:19 PM

7386 is a print film, not meant to be shot on.

If you do find bulk camera film, though, it is possible to have it cut and wound onto daylight spools. Check with a few 16mm labs and you can probably find one willing to do it at a reasonable price. I wouldn't recommend doing it yourself unless you have experience in that.
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#3 Dan Salzmann

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Posted 08 March 2007 - 02:32 PM

I've found that labs really hate doing this because any extra handling of the film can introduce dust and scratches and they do not want to risk that-understandable and how worth their while is it to offer this service?
On the other hand, they might give you darkroom access and let you do it. You just have to be careful.
It's not something that takes a rocket scientist to do.
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#4 Dory Breaux DP

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Posted 08 March 2007 - 02:32 PM

7386 is a print film, not meant to be shot on.


Call me stupid please :angry:
Good to know that, though. That saved me 70 bucks ha!
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#5 grantsmith

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Posted 08 March 2007 - 05:34 PM

i do this quite a bit. I have some rewind handles screwed to a piece of board. I just pop them in a changing tent and wind them on.

Unfortunately you have to wind them down onto the 100' spool then back onto another spool (as the film is the 'wrong' way around the first time) and like dan mentioned it is a bit of extra wear on the film. It dosnt take long though - the handles are geared so it can all be down in a couple of minutes.
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#6 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 08 March 2007 - 08:42 PM

i do this quite a bit. I have some rewind handles screwed to a piece of board. I just pop them in a changing tent and wind them on.

Unfortunately you have to wind them down onto the 100' spool then back onto another spool (as the film is the 'wrong' way around the first time) and like dan mentioned it is a bit of extra wear on the film. It dosnt take long though - the handles are geared so it can all be down in a couple of minutes.

1) You probaly can justify getting a "split reel" for use after you get film back form the lab anyway.
2) In a previous thread someone said that a geared rewind takes something like 42 turns to move 100ft, and my tests conlude that is very close.
3) you do have to wind twice as the film will be arranged wrong if you don't, although this is not a show stoper with double perf, the numbers will be wrong if you don't, and single perf will have the perfs on the wrong side.
4) print film is wound the wrong way, so you would not have to double wind it, if you have the light to shoot at ASA .5-ASA 5. Tell the lab to use their print processor though.
5) I always ask for my spools and cans back, although a friendly lab may have some cheap as they presumably end up with a lot of them.
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#7 Michael Carter

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Posted 11 March 2007 - 02:09 PM

The local film school has a tiny closet, about right for a toilet only, that is light proof, has a rewind setup and that is all. Lock the door and have a go at rewinding.
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#8 Dennis Kisilyov

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Posted 11 March 2007 - 02:59 PM

Don't do it. It does not save money!

New film wether on 100 x 10 , 400 x 2 or 1000 x 1 will cost you the same.
Sure if you're buying "miles" of it, then you get a discount.
But you'll get pretty much the same discount on 100' day spools that you would on
400' cores. When getting say... 20,000 ft.

What it will introduce is dust and other stuff onto the negative. And Labor Time.
Yeah, if you've found 1000ft of film for $10 on a core. Yeah re spool it for your camera.

But when buying new film it will not make any sense.
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