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Looking for a cheap 16mm package to rent.


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#1 Jamie McIntyre

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Posted 11 March 2007 - 07:08 PM

So I'm in film school and we have been learning loads about 16mm recently. Now i have the urge to shoot a short on 16mm.

Where can i find a good 16mm package, you know, with a set of primes and all the usual stuff?

Maybe below 500 dollars for like 3 days. I know its stretching it buy heh - I'm a student.

I really like the Arri SR2 - We have been using that in school. Also, what is a good film stock to achieve a really grainy, contrasty, noir look. Black ands white obviously.
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#2 Matt Ely

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Posted 11 March 2007 - 10:09 PM

So I'm in film school and we have been learning loads about 16mm recently. Now i have the urge to shoot a short on 16mm.

Where can i find a good 16mm package, you know, with a set of primes and all the usual stuff?

Maybe below 500 dollars for like 3 days. I know its stretching it buy heh - I'm a student.

I really like the Arri SR2 - We have been using that in school. Also, what is a good film stock to achieve a really grainy, contrasty, noir look. Black ands white obviously.


Where are you located? Matt Ely, Aaton XTR Prod and Aaton Ltr7 owner, Bozeman, Montana
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#3 Jamie McIntyre

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Posted 12 March 2007 - 01:05 AM

Where are you located? Matt Ely, Aaton XTR Prod and Aaton Ltr7 owner, Bozeman, Montana


I'm in LA dude. Sorry.

I want to avoid rental houses becasue i feel they will take advantage of my lack of knowledge and con me :(
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#4 Patrick Cooper

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Posted 12 March 2007 - 01:39 AM

Regarding film stocks - usually the faster the film, the more grainy it is but also lower contrast. However, I note that you want both a contrasty and grainy image. This is one possible option - if you are shooting B & W reversal film, you could rate the film at a higher asa rating and then tell the lab to compensate - they will extend the developing time and this will lead to an increase in grain and contrast. Other than that, you will generally find that slow speed films are quite contrasty but fine grained. And faster films usually have more grain but lower contrast. Then again, there might be some film stocks made in some Eastern Bloc countries that may have both the grain and contrast that you are looking for. Of course there's also post production enhancement - shoot a fast grainy film stock and then increase the contrast in post after telecine.
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#5 Jamie McIntyre

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Posted 12 March 2007 - 02:36 AM

Regarding film stocks - usually the faster the film, the more grainy it is but also lower contrast. However, I note that you want both a contrasty and grainy image. This is one possible option - if you are shooting B & W reversal film, you could rate the film at a higher asa rating and then tell the lab to compensate - they will extend the developing time and this will lead to an increase in grain and contrast. Other than that, you will generally find that slow speed films are quite contrasty but fine grained. And faster films usually have more grain but lower contrast. Then again, there might be some film stocks made in some Eastern Bloc countries that may have both the grain and contrast that you are looking for. Of course there's also post production enhancement - shoot a fast grainy film stock and then increase the contrast in post after telecine.


Wow thank you for that most helpful reply. Thanks a lot :)

Would you specific stock could you recommend for me?

The The higer ASA one, maybe a 500T? Like what kodak stock?

:)
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#6 Patrick Cooper

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Posted 12 March 2007 - 06:18 AM

Yes, Kodak do have a 500T film but that is a colour negative stock. Though I guess you could always change the image to monochrome in post! Some people are not fooled by this however - turning a colour image into B & W - claiming that it has a different 'look' to true B & W film. The fastest B & W film currently in Kodak's catalogue is Tri-X which is a 200asa reversal film. I didn't find this film particularly grainy when I shot it but it would be good for you to expose a test film and see for yourself what 'look' it has when exposed and developed normally. From there, you can decide on how to go about getting the ?look? you want. If you are planning to telecine the film, there will naturally be an increase in contrast during the transfer. If this increase in contrast is not enough, you can manipulate it in post. And if the grain is not enough, you can always shoot another roll rating it at a higher asa speed and tell the lab to ?push process.?
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#7 Sam Wells

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Posted 12 March 2007 - 11:22 AM

Tri-X reversal would work for you.

Gives plenty of contrast to my eye. Pushing it can look like a kind of lithography; I prefer the grey scale normally. Also the push - with that contrast build up may not help you with shadow detail much. I'd try it at normal development myself, find the contrast you need in lighting.

You can try and find a private owner but I'm not sure why the rental house would "try & con you"

Either would want someone familiar with the camera working with it.

-Sam
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#8 Nathan Milford

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Posted 12 March 2007 - 12:05 PM

Jamie,

As per the forum rules, please use your full name when posting to this forum.

Thanks.
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#9 Jamie McIntyre

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Posted 12 March 2007 - 12:15 PM

Jamie,

As per the forum rules, please use your full name when posting to this forum.

Thanks.


I cannot change my uesername. Soooo??
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#10 Mitch Gross

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Posted 12 March 2007 - 12:20 PM

I cannot change my uesername. Soooo??

So put in a signature that identifies you properly and add a general location as well.

Don't know why you'd think a reputable rental house would con you. Your job is tiny for them and they have far bigger fish to fry than to try to trick you out of a couple of bucks.

You could always try Abel Cine Tech in LA for an Aaton.
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#11 Jamie McIntyre

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Posted 12 March 2007 - 12:24 PM

Done :) - Thanks Mitch.

And thanks everyone else for the advice. I always learn something new on every visit to this forum!
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#12 Frank Barrera

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Posted 12 March 2007 - 01:51 PM

what is a good film stock to achieve a really grainy, contrasty, noir look. Black ands white obviously.

reversal is a good idea. but if you really want grain and contrast. shoot Tri X 7266, push it two stops rating it at 640, then cross process. I did this once a couple of years ago and we were still surprised at how tight the grain remained. The contrast was extreme and perfect. I would like to try and push it three stops just to see that grain...

But I wouldn't attempt any of it with out your own test with bracketing exposures. reversal has no room for error. In our test we stuck with pushing 2 stops knowing from a past project that pushing reversal just one stop wasn't grainy enough.
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Visual Products

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