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2nd AC'ing with an ARRISR3


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#1 Evan Pierre

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Posted 12 March 2007 - 04:08 AM

Hey everyone, im going to be 2nd AC (or something like that) on a highschool film at the end of March and I was just looking for some advice. I'm going to be working with an ARRI SR3 and I was just wondering if there is anything in particular that I should know about this camera. Have you experienced any strange problems, have to found some sort of special tricks or techniques etc.? I have basically no experience in this field so any thoughts are greatly appreciated.

Thanks!

-Evan P.

Edited by Evan Pierre, 12 March 2007 - 04:09 AM.

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#2 Jamie McIntyre

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Posted 12 March 2007 - 04:13 AM

Hey everyone, im going to be 2nd AC (or something like that) on a highschool film at the end of March and I was just looking for some advice. I'm going to be working with an ARRI SR3 and I was just wondering if there is anything in particular that I should know about this camera. Have you experienced any strange problems, have to found some sort of special tricks or techniques etc.? I have basically no experience in this field so any thoughts are greatly appreciated.

Thanks!

-Evan P.


My advice is to let someone that knows what they are doing do the job. As a second AC what exactly are you doing?

I mean are you loading, or do you have a loader?

Your school is making a big mistake letting someone without ANY experience use that camera.
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#3 Evan Pierre

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Posted 12 March 2007 - 04:23 AM

My advice is to let someone that knows what they are doing do the job. As a second AC what exactly are you doing?

I mean are you loading, or do you have a loader?

Your school is making a big mistake letting someone without ANY experience use that camera.


Sorry if I phrased my question wrong. :( All I was asking was for anything special I should know about the camera.

This is a highschool film program, we do this to learn. You can know as much technical information as you want, but you can't truly learn withought hands on experience.

I was only asking for some advice, I don't know exactly what I'll be doing yet.
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#4 Adam Frisch FSF

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Posted 12 March 2007 - 04:23 AM

The SR3 is virtually vice-free. It's like the equivalent to the 435 - a true workhorse.
Not as nice to handhold as the Aaton's, but that's about it. Also, big lenses tend to bump
into the viewfinder so all 35mm lenses can't be used.
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#5 Francesco Bonomo

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Posted 12 March 2007 - 04:46 AM

loading the SR magazines is fairly easy, and i'm sure you can find a pdf SR3 manual on the arri website.
As others have said, the SR3 is truly a beast, you shouldn't have any problem.

However, if the camera you're using has not been serviced well, you could have a couple of problems. If the camera stays on even when you switch it off, just disconnect the battery plug, or slightly hit the bottom of the camera with your leatherman. It works 99% of the time, it happens because of a relay on the bottom that tends to overheat in the oldest cameras.
Also, if you have a videotap, make sure the video camera is aligned and switch it off between takes because it consumes a lot of battery power.
If you shoot night ext. or in some cold location, place the batteries on a apple box or something like that because cold temperatures suck the life out of them.

You really shouldn't worry, it's a great camera and it almost never fails you. If I could afford it and if I was in the camera department, I'd buy one :D
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#6 Jamie McIntyre

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Posted 12 March 2007 - 04:57 AM

Sorry if I phrased my question wrong. :( All I was asking was for anything special I should know about the camera.

This is a highschool film program, we do this to learn. You can know as much technical information as you want, but you can't truly learn withought hands on experience.

I was only asking for some advice, I don't know exactly what I'll be doing yet.


Hey man, sorry if i came across wrong.

I thought you were doing a science class or something and using the SR3 to document something. As in it wasnt a film class.

You shouldn't have any problems, like the other guy said, its fairly easy to load because its a co-axial mag.

Just download a manual dude and you are on your way.

If you need any help dude, just PM me or email me jamiesmcintyre@mac.com

:)
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#7 Chris Keth

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Posted 12 March 2007 - 03:01 PM

As Adam said, some lenses can bump into the viewfinder so be careful when you mount a lens for the first time. Everything is really very simple. The only thing you may want to check out is a manual for the menu system, as it needs some explanation that can't easily be done here. Other than that, very straightforward. Try to load a mag before you get there. It's not difficult but it has a certain "feel" (when you put film through the magazine mechanism properly) that is nice to know beforehand. You just have to be very gentle with it to do it properly.
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#8 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 12 March 2007 - 05:54 PM

I thought you were doing a science class or something and using the SR3 to document something. As in it wasnt a film class.


What?! Ha ha, why would you assume something like that? lol

That's really frickin' awesome that you're shooting 16mm in a HIGH SCHOOL class. For me it was nothin' but video (back in the day of S-VHS!), so you should consider yourself lucky!

All SR's are relatively trouble free, so long as they're serviced and in good condition. So, I wouldn't expect any tricky situations arrising during your shoot.

As a 2nd A.C., I'm guessing you won't be working directly with the camera too often though...you'll most likely be the camera crew's gopher, taking measurements and running slate.
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#9 Kenny N Suleimanagich

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Posted 12 March 2007 - 07:13 PM

Evan! Man you are the ONLY person who takes my advice. Hey guys just to let you know, as camera dept head I gave Evan this job because he's the most fit of any of teh freshmen to do it, so advice you guys given will be taken to its best. Evan, I'll teah you how to load the mags etc. so dont get too worried about that, but once again I'm so glad youtook my advice and came to this site!
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#10 Evan Pierre

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Posted 12 March 2007 - 07:48 PM

That's really frickin' awesome that you're shooting 16mm in a HIGH SCHOOL class. For me it was nothin' but video (back in the day of S-VHS!), so you should consider yourself lucky!


Thank you so much for everyone's replies. Im astounded by the amount of helpful responses so quickly! :)

Great advice all around and I cannot wait to begin shooting this film!!!!! :lol:

Also Jonathan, I hear that we are one of the few highschools left in the country that shoot actual 16mm film, Sony Studios and Culver Studios (Howard Hughes) are both located here aswell. :]
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#11 Jon Kukla

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Posted 13 March 2007 - 05:58 AM

This quick guide is a good way to get yourself briefed on all the basics in no time. If you can read it while the equipment is at hand, so much the better.

Good luck!
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#12 Camillo Foramitti

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Posted 13 March 2007 - 07:54 AM

If you do handheld stuff bring something soft with you that can be used as a shoulder pad. Not having a satisfying handheld configuration is the only bad thing I know about the SR3. Otherwise it's a great camera, loading is very easy.
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#13 Christopher Schneider

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Posted 13 March 2007 - 07:09 PM

I love the camera and have had great experiences with it.

But I have been on 2 sets where the 2nds/Loaders, who were experienced, weren't paying attention of something during downloading and the center droped out resulting in a brainwrap. Practice downloading, it's not hard to do, but with the loose tail there is more chance of the film unspooling.

And, since it's the SR3 try shooting some stuff at varient shutter angles, it would be an interesting way to learn the process, both the pros and cons of doing so.

Is it the SR3 High Speed? If not, you can still shoot some slow motion, just not as slow as the High Speed is capable. You still can do a "speed ramp" even if it's not the High Speed, try it, you can attempt to do it while iris racking.

This is a very sophistocated camera for High School, so try everything your teacher will let you.
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#14 Annie Wengenroth

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Posted 14 March 2007 - 12:13 PM

I dont' know if anyone has suggested this already because I'm too lazy to scroll through the thread, but if you label the feed and takeup sides nice and big, it will make life a little easier. It sounds stupid, but when you're tired or trying to move too fast, anything can happen. Also, practice downloading the mags in daylight so you can see how the collapsible core works and know what it feels like to pop it open. Have fun!
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#15 Evan Pierre

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Posted 14 March 2007 - 09:16 PM

Great! Thanks everyone!

Already looking forward to our shoot :]
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