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Ideal Lighting kit?


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#1 Michael Dean Gibbs

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Posted 15 March 2007 - 12:54 PM

Greetings,

I am thinking about purchasing a lighting kit and could use some advice.

If you were confined to a $2000 budget, which kit would you buy? Would you go for Fresnel or open-faced lights (or a combination of both)...120v or 220v lights...(3) 1000w lights or a combo of wattages?

I could really use some help from others with more experience than I. :)

Thanks,

mdg
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#2 Juan Pablo Chapela

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Posted 15 March 2007 - 02:26 PM

Hi Michael...

I asked more or less the same question some days ago... You can follow the thread named "Documentary light kit". I got some good input and advices on a compact kit that could very well help you...

Hope it helps, if not I'm sure someone here will.

Cheers,

Juan Pablo
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#3 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 15 March 2007 - 02:33 PM

If you were confined to a $2000 budget, which kit would you buy? Would you go for Fresnel or open-faced lights (or a combination of both)...120v or 220v lights...(3) 1000w lights or a combo of wattages?


A couple 1kw's fresnels (especially if you're wanting to blast some light indoors from outdoors for certain scenes) and a couple 650w's fresnels would make for a fine starter's kit.

Also, I'd consider getting a couple of good quality Photoflex softbox kits, such as these: http://www.bhphotovi...egoryNavigation

I really enjoy using Photoflex stuff, they're perfect for film or video and have a really great look. A fine competitor for Chimera's wonderful tools.

Edited by Jonathan Bowerbank, 15 March 2007 - 02:33 PM.

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#4 James Brown

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Posted 16 March 2007 - 09:04 AM

Hi,

If you only have a small amount of money i would definitely talk to a gaffer or a rental house and purchase some second hand small tungsten units. You can get a bunch of 650's and pup's quite cheap these days. I would spend whatever's left in materials to construct gripping equipment. Cutters, blacks, diffusion frames ect ect. If there's any left get your basic correction gels and diffusion for the doors, gaffer & black wrap. By now you will be over budget but on your way.
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#5 Michael Dean Gibbs

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Posted 17 March 2007 - 01:46 PM

Thank your for the imput gentleman.

Thank your for the input gentleman.
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#6 Nick Bennett

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Posted 17 March 2007 - 01:56 PM

Check out Lowels Rifa-lite, very quick to set-up and very light weight if you have to travel.

I have a couple of KinoFlo 2ft 4-banks and Arri Fresnel 650W's and 300w's etc but when I have to fly or work on my own I use the Rifa's and sometimes with Dedolight or two.

It's a simple but effective bit of design.
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#7 Michael Dean Gibbs

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Posted 17 March 2007 - 02:16 PM

Nick,

I have been looking at a 20"or 30" Chimera lantern as well...could you tell me some of the advantages and disadvantages of the Chimera vs. the Rifa-lite as it relates to lighting situations you've experienced?

Thanks,

mdg
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#8 Nick Bennett

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Posted 17 March 2007 - 02:34 PM

Yes, I also have a Chimera for one of my 650's and it does offer the flexibilty of changing over to barn doors etc, however if you mainly use soft light then you are dragging around the extra weight of the fixture.

Chimera can be erected fairly quickly but the Rifa is even quicker and is very light (it opens like an umbrella with the lamp already inside) so it can used with light weight stand.

My preference has changed to the Rifa mainly due to the nature of the stuff that I'm shooting, lots of European flights so they keep the excess luggage down.

If you go for one of the larger Wattage models it will also give you scope use CTB and still get a respectable output for interview situations etc.

Edited by Nick Bennett, 17 March 2007 - 02:37 PM.

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#9 Sam Wells

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Posted 17 March 2007 - 09:28 PM

I used the Rifa as key for some doc interviews last year (the director owns it - an incentive I guess). I really liked it for this kind of stuff: very fast and portable (I lit an interview with Tavis Smiley where I had like less than 60 seconds to tweak the lighting, I'm not joking)..... so maybe a bit quicker all around than Chimera (a plus with Chimera of course is if you use say an Arri fresnel and don't want the softbox, then you've got an Arri fresnel !)

I'm less inclined to these approaches for dramatic work. But THAT covers such a wide base.......

-Sam
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