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HVX200 and Sekonic L-758Cine


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#1 Jasper Granderath

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Posted 15 March 2007 - 02:29 PM

Hello,

i'll do a lighting job in the naxt days and the Panasonic HVX200 will be used. I own a Sekonic L-758Cine lightmeter and need help for the camera exposure profiling. It seems that i won't be able to do the exposure profiling with the camera at my side.

So, what ISO sensitivity, compensation value, clipping point adjustment, dynamic range setting and clipping point setting can you recommend?

I need some guiding values and know that a ultra-precise adjustment is not possible this way, or am I wrong?

Any help appreciated.

Thank you!

Jasper Granderath
Zurich
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#2 Ken Minehan

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Posted 16 March 2007 - 11:18 PM

in the past 1 year i've been doing a lot of shoots on the HVX 202 (PAL version). I set my meter on 320 ISO on 25 fps.

The latitude on this camera is not great. anything above 2 stops over will start to burn. But you can go around 3 stops under and still hold details in the blacks. But just beware the blacks have a tendency to go a bit grainy and milky, when shooting wide open. Generally i like to shoot on 2.8-4.

If the DP likes to use Zebras there are 2 zebra settings. I like to set the 1st zebra settings on 75% and the 2nd zebra on 100%. I was told that 105% is the max before the image is burnt. so 75% and 100% are safe settings.

Also for this camera, it's a good idea to get yourself Polariser, ND3, ND6, ND9. When shooting anything with the sky, i will always use a polar. The camera has in built NDs but i feel that sometimes it takes too much out. So by having your own NDs you have more control of the amount of light you let through the lens.

The above mentioned settings is what i use, and it works well for me, but maybe other DPs have other ways that work for them.

regards
Ken Minehan
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#3 Tim O'Connor

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Posted 17 March 2007 - 09:15 AM

in the past 1 year i've been doing a lot of shoots on the HVX 202 (PAL version). I set my meter on 320 ISO on 25 fps.

The latitude on this camera is not great. anything above 2 stops over will start to burn. But you can go around 3 stops under and still hold details in the blacks. But just beware the blacks have a tendency to go a bit grainy and milky, when shooting wide open. Generally i like to shoot on 2.8-4.

If the DP likes to use Zebras there are 2 zebra settings. I like to set the 1st zebra settings on 75% and the 2nd zebra on 100%. I was told that 105% is the max before the image is burnt. so 75% and 100% are safe settings.

Also for this camera, it's a good idea to get yourself Polariser, ND3, ND6, ND9. When shooting anything with the sky, i will always use a polar. The camera has in built NDs but i feel that sometimes it takes too much out. So by having your own NDs you have more control of the amount of light you let through the lens.

The above mentioned settings is what i use, and it works well for me, but maybe other DPs have other ways that work for them.

regards
Ken Minehan


That's good advice, though in my experience the 320 value seems to be truer in situations with
more light. The camera seems to be less sensitive with less light, and respond more to
a value of 160 as you get more open in my experience. In fact, I find that the light neeeded
to get a 2.8 corresponds to a 160 value.

I agree with setting the high zebras to 100 rather than 105 but I like to set the other zebras
to 70 as that's right in the middle of the 60-80 range that seems to cover skin tones
and good exposure.

I was shooting a car scene Tuesday night with a WHITE white guy (typical fair skinned sunburn
material) and a much darker skinned actresss and it was quite interesting because looking at the
zebras appearing on his face so much sooner than hers; it seemed more like his skin came from
the hard side of a reflector.

When I scout, or simply am looking someplace without the camera with me, I like to measure
footcandles and think in those terms, although I'm sure that either way will work for you.

Also, I have set all the gain settings to "0".

Good luck.

Ken, I've never been to Singapore but I understand that it can get really hot and humid. Has
that affected your shooting at all?
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#4 Jasper Granderath

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Posted 18 March 2007 - 08:10 PM

Hey guys,

thanks for all the useful inputs. It helped me a lot.

And Tim, your point about footcandles is quite interesting towards me. Until now i've spend much too less attention on measuring/understanding footcandles. I wanna change this.

And another point: Shooting with the HVX200 makes measuring on 25 fps (PAL) possible, but shooting with the Canon XH A1 in the 25F mode recommends measuring a shutter of a 1/50 second, right? As far as I know, the Canon records interlaced and creates a fake of a deinterlaced picture...

Thanks a lot!

Jasper Granderath
Zurich

Edited by Jasper Granderath, 18 March 2007 - 08:11 PM.

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#5 Walter Graff

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Posted 18 March 2007 - 10:20 PM

That's good advice, though in my experience the 320 value seems to be truer in situations with
more light. The camera seems to be less sensitive with less light


This is true of most all video cameras where the microlenses that are supposed to help you get more sensitivity help least when you need them most, in low light. Also the MTF of a video camera is not stable enough to have a baseline throughout the exposure range so outside a camera like this could be a EI640 but indoors with less light EI320. So a light meter can help in video but is not exact through the exposure range of a camera. You also do not want to shoot anywhere near f8 or greater of all the highness you are trying to accomplish with HD is lost since 75% MTF is below f8.

Edited by WALTER GRAFF, 18 March 2007 - 10:21 PM.

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#6 Ken Minehan

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Posted 19 March 2007 - 12:05 AM

shooting in Singapore can be interesting at times. The weather can be a real issue.

The other day i was on shoot, we set up for a wide shot in an open field, with a silhouetted tree in the back ground. We set up a 20 x 20 blue screen to comp in the children running around. So everything was set, i did three or four rehearsals, was about to roll when a down pour came out of no where. It was really very unexpected. My CA covered the camera with a plastic sheet, and took it in to the truck but everything else was saturated including ourselves. So rain is an issue in singapore.

Also it's rare to get rich blue skies, you often get that white, grey hazy thing instead. Also it's rare to get a clean sunset. Before the sun descends below the horizon, it gets lost in a thick haze.

Sometimes it's frustrating when shooting an exterior scene, when the sun is hitting the talents quite hard from one side. So naturally we set up a butterfly to soften it. But by the time we set up the silk, the sun hides behind the cloud. My gaffers hate me for that. haha. Basically the sun condition is forever changing. I am from Australia originally, and i think i was quite spoilt when shooting there. we used to get 12 hours of rick blue skies with nice fluffy clouds, and the air is so crisp. It's just delicious. But coming to singapore to shoot has taught me so much about outdoor shooting. I'm very glad came here.

I haven't had much trouble with humidity yet. But we sometimes get the lenses and ground glass fogging up when we go from aircon to outside.

I have hear that in the US the back focus the PS technik or the Pro 35 can change according to cold weather. Is that true?

regards
Ken Minehan
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