Jump to content


Photo

Old Film


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 Eugene Lehnert

Eugene Lehnert
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 203 posts
  • Other
  • New York, NY

Posted 15 March 2007 - 11:13 PM

I was given some old film. Some 35mm some 16mm. 2 sets of cans have not been opened. One set is Fujichrome 8540 daylight and the other is Kodak 5293 EXR. Can these still be processed? I want to experiment shooting with them.

Eugene
  • 0

#2 Delorme Jean-Marie

Delorme Jean-Marie
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 513 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • paris, france

Posted 16 March 2007 - 04:54 AM

if the film wasn't frozen by the time you get them, i'm quite shure they are dead!
they will have a milky aspec, no blacks....

there is one test you can do but it can be a little expensive it's to send 3ft of a can to the lab for a sensito test
they will send to you the caracteristic curve of your roll. and theire conclusions.

keep the rolls as dumy rolls to practice loading

if you experiment shooting with them it will cost you a lot of time and money to experiment that your film is too old to experiment something else.

:( sorry for the bad news
  • 0

#3 Jon Kukla

Jon Kukla
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 399 posts
  • Other

Posted 16 March 2007 - 12:01 PM

I wouldn't be so dismissive. Are they finished as "normal" rolls? Yes, very likely, unless they had completely ideal conditions (and even then...). However, last year I found 8000 feet of 5293 completely randomly which had been left in a regularly overheated projection booth for at least several years. We ran some tests on it and informed our lab what we were shooting and attempting. The lab claimed it to be too fogged to bother printing, but a cursory glance at the negative showed otherwise, so I had it printed, and discovered it was VERY MUCH usable, especially when overexposed by 1 stop.

We ended up using the 5293 for all of the dream sequences of our film, and it came out very well for giving a not-quite-normal eerie feel to the scenes. It does clearly look a bit more "stale" than the regular film, but if carefully used for particular effect, you definitely have some viable film stock on your hands.

The most important thing to do is test the rolls (test all of them as if they are each separate stocks), and determine what you are willing to accept and how you need to rate it.
  • 0

#4 Eugene Lehnert

Eugene Lehnert
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 203 posts
  • Other
  • New York, NY

Posted 16 March 2007 - 08:14 PM

I'm happy accepting whatever the image looks like. I wanted to see if it could still be processed. I just wanted to try some experimental stuff with them.
  • 0

#5 Patrick Cooper

Patrick Cooper
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 908 posts
  • Other

Posted 16 March 2007 - 11:34 PM

Is that Fujichrome film a reversal stock? Fuji don't make reversal 16mm film anymore and I have no idea what development process this film used.....so good luck on finding a lab that can develop it if you do shoot it. I would do lots of research on Fuji reversal films if I were you before doing anything with it.
  • 0

#6 Patrick Cooper

Patrick Cooper
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 908 posts
  • Other

Posted 16 March 2007 - 11:45 PM

Ive just done a Google search and apparently, Fujichrome 8540 is actually Fuji Velvia - the infamous slide film repackaged for motion picture use. I admit that I shoot a lot of Velvia myself in medium format still photography. As long as you find a lab that can process movie films in E6, you should be fine as far as developing goes. But the question remains - is the film still in good condition and worthy of shooting? Good luck.
  • 0

#7 K Borowski

K Borowski
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3905 posts
  • Camera Operator
  • I.A.T.S.E. Local # 600 Eastern Region

Posted 22 March 2007 - 04:20 PM

If it's movie film, I'd send it to Martin Baumgarten. He's your best bet, the man knows his poop about film processing, EVERYTHING about film processing. Over the phone he's explained the workings of 3 different movie processing tanks, developer replenishment, bleach replenishment, densitometry, color comparators, color space theory, just one of the most technically knowledgeable laboratory guys you'd ever meet.

You'll probably have to wait a while to get it done though. He does it as a hobby only.
  • 0

#8 Robert Houllahan

Robert Houllahan
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1626 posts
  • Industry Rep
  • Providence R.I.

Posted 23 March 2007 - 02:29 AM

If it's movie film, I'd send it to Martin Baumgarten. He's your best bet, the man knows his poop about film processing, EVERYTHING about film processing. Over the phone he's explained the workings of 3 different movie processing tanks, developer replenishment, bleach replenishment, densitometry, color comparators, color space theory, just one of the most technically knowledgeable laboratory guys you'd ever meet.

You'll probably have to wait a while to get it done though. He does it as a hobby only.



Rocky Mountain film lab would process this, usually older film like this will end up B+W instead of coloor, or at least that is usually what happens with older Kodachrome.

-Rob-
  • 0

#9 Sam Wells

Sam Wells
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1751 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 23 March 2007 - 09:34 AM

Velvia processing

http://www.spectrafi...eo.com/Lab.html

-Sam
  • 0


Tai Audio

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Willys Widgets

rebotnix Technologies

Visual Products

Broadcast Solutions Inc

The Slider

CineLab

Wooden Camera

Technodolly

Rig Wheels Passport

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

FJS International, LLC

Metropolis Post

Aerial Filmworks

Ritter Battery

Glidecam

CineTape

Abel Cine

Paralinx LLC

CineTape

Ritter Battery

Aerial Filmworks

FJS International, LLC

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Broadcast Solutions Inc

The Slider

Rig Wheels Passport

Willys Widgets

Glidecam

Visual Products

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineLab

Technodolly

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Abel Cine

Wooden Camera

Metropolis Post

Tai Audio

Paralinx LLC

rebotnix Technologies