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Knife in the Water


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#1 Lisa Davidson

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Posted 18 March 2007 - 01:40 AM

Does anybody know what film stock Knife in the Water was shot on? It looks like Tri-X, but I can't really tell.
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#2 Brian Pritchard

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Posted 20 March 2007 - 06:07 PM

Does anybody know what film stock Knife in the Water was shot on? It looks like Tri-X, but I can't really tell.

I worked on the original neg of Knife in the Water about 15 years ago; I believe it was shot on Kodak 35mm negative film either Plus-X or Double-X. Unfortunately I do not remember which. If you have access to a 35mm print you might be able to see the original negative edge numbers which would tell you which stock had been used. We made a Fine Grain Duplicating Positive followed by a Duplicate Negative which was used for release printing. We only had the original negative for 3 weeks before it was returned to Poland.

Brian
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#3 Lisa Davidson

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Posted 22 March 2007 - 01:16 AM

I worked on the original neg of Knife in the Water about 15 years ago; I believe it was shot on Kodak 35mm negative film either Plus-X or Double-X. Unfortunately I do not remember which. If you have access to a 35mm print you might be able to see the original negative edge numbers which would tell you which stock had been used. We made a Fine Grain Duplicating Positive followed by a Duplicate Negative which was used for release printing. We only had the original negative for 3 weeks before it was returned to Poland.

Brian

Hi, Brian,
Thank you; that's amazing! If I understand this, you printed the original negative onto Fine Grain Duplicating, which gave you another negative, and then you made prints from that? Sorry, that's not what you said, but I'm wondering about generation loss; isn't that an extra step? I don't really know much about this . . . . The original was a neg, then you made a pos, and then a neg, and then the release prints were positives from that? And it still looks great.
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 22 March 2007 - 08:17 AM

Black & white duplicates through fine-grains much better than color does through an IP/IN, partially because you can always keep adjusting the gamma, and a little more contrast is not such a bad thing in b&w.

Yes, generally it's always neg-pos-neg-pos even with restorations.

There are a lot of classic b&w movies where the original negative is lost, yet we still have great prints that can be made thanks to an existing fine-grain master.
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