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Kodak 7374 'Television Recording Film'


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#1 Nick Mulder

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Posted 22 March 2007 - 05:36 AM

I've found another old bulk lot of film but have no idea of its specs aside from it comes in 2400' cans which apparently hold '2 rolls' - not sure if its a total of 2 x 1200' or 2 x 2400' per can though

Its single perf and no mention of mag stripe ...

What ASA ? neg/reversal ?

any info/ideas appreciated B)

cheers,
Nick
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#2 Bernhard Zitz

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Posted 22 March 2007 - 06:09 AM

In the kodak chronologie of mp films there's a note under 1955... seems to be very old...

http://www.kodak.com...t/chrono2.shtml
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#3 Nick Mulder

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Posted 22 March 2007 - 02:04 PM

bugger! there it is... - I was looking at that site but my eyes must have scanned over it...

It says its a Kinescope type film - used to shoot CRT monitors back in the days...

so it would be reversal ? and the speed ?

I wonder when it was discontinued .
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#4 John Holland

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Posted 22 March 2007 - 02:13 PM

I think it would have been a neg stock .
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#5 Sam Wells

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Posted 22 March 2007 - 02:32 PM

I wonder when it was discontinued .


It's listed in my 1982 "Eastman Professional Motion Picture Films"

Blue & UV sensitive (for monochrome CRT phospors)

-Sam
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#6 K Borowski

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Posted 22 March 2007 - 04:07 PM

Well, from the name it seems pretty obvious that it's designed for recording off of a TV. Probably pretty slow, don't know what the contrast would be like. In any case, pretty useless except for experimental stuff, Probably it's not very fast, so you could probably figure out a way to develop it with acceptable levels of fog, assuming it hasn't been in a 90 degree attic for all that time
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#7 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 22 March 2007 - 09:17 PM

Probably pretty slow, don't know what the contrast would be like. In any case, pretty useless except for experimental stuff, Probably it's not very fast,

Not too slow, the TV guys used to shoot from a P31 Phospher CRT and then quicly develop the film and telecine it to show the same program in the next time zone. Probaly in half hour chunks, and the nagative would have been packed two rolls in a 35mm can.

Beofre Vidio tape, the Tv networks were one of Kodaks biggest customers, and ALL the network shows were filmed when the shown in new york, and played back from the Kinescope negative an hour lor two later in teh mountan and yet again in the pacfic zone. The delay in proecessing probaly started the tradition of the cnetral zone getting the same program at the time they are shown in the eastern zone, so the schedule is one hour out in cnetral time zones.

The only Kinescope print I ever managed to snag off e-bay was from about 1965, and was a "regular" print complete with signs the sound was printed off a separate neg. The film even inculded the VITS test paterns at the top of the frame.

the P31 phospor is fairly bright and is rich in infrared. I am sure that the emuslion was matched to the exact spectral output of the CRT ot get the best speed posible.
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#8 Nick Mulder

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Posted 22 March 2007 - 09:48 PM

Well, I'm up for 33,000 ft of the stuff for about $491 of your United States Ringgits ...

It is high con and gives deeper blacks than 'normal' B+W according to the seller who got back to me. He would rate it at around 50ASA indoors but much higher in the sun because of its freaky deaky response to UV - UV filters tend to become more like ND to it apparently

He hasn't developed it for a while and has lost his info but reckons its not extreme chemistry or anything, I think he's searching for it though ...

Could be a goer - I like B+W and love being able to experiment without worry of the costs ...
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#9 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 24 March 2007 - 03:01 PM

Well, I'm up for 33,000 ft of the stuff for about $491 of your United States Ringgits ...

It is high con and gives deeper blacks than 'normal' B+W according to the seller who got back to me. He would rate it at around 50ASA indoors but much higher in the sun because of its freaky deaky response to UV - UV filters tend to become more like ND to it apparently

He hasn't developed it for a while and has lost his info but reckons its not extreme chemistry or anything, I think he's searching for it though ...

Could be a goer - I like B+W and love being able to experiment without worry of the costs ...


A film that old (even B&W) has likely suffered some adverse aging effects.
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#10 Brian Pritchard

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Posted 24 March 2007 - 04:52 PM

I think it would have been a neg stock .

I have a copy of the data sheet for this film: 'Eastman' Television recording Film 16mm coated on a grey base. It recommends developing in D76 at 68 degrees F: 5 mins will give a gamma of 0.88; 3 mins a gamma of 0.57. Developing in D16 at the same temperature will give a gamma of 1.47. It is sensitive to blue and ultra violet. It also says it can be used for making B/W release prints, having a speed between 5 and 10 times that of nomal print stock 7302. The datasheet is dated 1967.
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#11 Clive Tobin

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Posted 28 March 2007 - 08:05 PM

I have a copy of the data sheet for this film: .... The datasheet is dated 1967. Brian


This used to be one of my favorite stocks for experimenting with. As a negative it was something like ASA 16 daylight and 4 tungsten, processed to a more or less normal contrast negative. Processed reversal it came out with a crazy high contrast, at about 16 daylight. We used to spool it down into 100' lengths for people to shoot titles on, with reversal processing, since it was available in double perf and went through a camera much more smoothly than similar contrast optical sound recording stock.

I also played with pre-flashing it through the base side on the C Printer to bring the D-max down to about 2.4 I think, and sold it as Economy Reversal. If you get really old stock it will be on clear base instead of grey. Kodak experimented with it also: At one time they recommended using their Viscomat hot processor and 7374 to make actually better 16mm variable area sound negatives than you could get at the time using the official 7372 material.
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#12 Nick Mulder

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Posted 28 March 2007 - 11:32 PM

I've got 24,000ft of it in the trunk - heavy, I tells ya - the other two cans went to friends ...

I did a test of 100ft and developed it in thirds - one reversal, one reversal with chemical re-exposure and one negative ...

I'd rate it about 40ASA outdoors as this is where the tests were done - reversal gives crazy contrast... I'll try pulling it next - neg, its hard to tell yet as I havent built a printer or had it transfered yet, but it appears high-con also ...

The base seems to be grey - so does this mean its newer ?

I'm very happy - incidentally when doing reversal with the chem re-exposure (sodium sulphide stinkbomb stylez) I get the exact same look as one of my favourite B+W films - Tarkovsky's 'Stalker' - but the the look there I think was created printing B+W onto color stock ....
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#13 Leo Anthony Vale

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Posted 29 March 2007 - 03:30 PM

The base seems to be grey - so does this mean its newer ?


Anti-halation.

Camera stock rather than print stock.
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#14 Clive Tobin

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Posted 31 March 2007 - 12:10 PM

Anti-halation.Camera stock rather than print stock.


You didn't read my previous post.

He is referring to my comment that when originally introduced it came on a clear base instead of the later grey base.
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#15 Nick Mulder

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Posted 23 June 2007 - 08:06 PM

This used to be one of my favorite stocks for experimenting with. As a negative it was something like ASA 16 daylight and 4 tungsten, processed to a more or less normal contrast negative.

Gidday Clive,

I've been processing this stock as reversal so far - D94/bleach/clear/sodium sulfide (cheaper) - what particular chems would you use for this to develop as neg ? Any special soup/process/time that makes it come out like a box of birds ?

Any info would be appreciated -

Nick
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#16 Clive Tobin

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Posted 23 June 2007 - 09:12 PM

Gidday Clive,
I've been processing this stock as reversal so far - D94/bleach/clear/sodium sulfide (cheaper) - what particular chems would you use for this to develop as neg ? Any special soup/process/time that makes it come out like a box of birds ?...

I think the D-76 is a bit strong for this stock, I would try D-96 or D-76 diluted 1:1 at about 6 minutes at room temp. The H&D curve is a bit screwy though with no straight line portion so the contrast will depend on how much exposure you give it, more so than other stocks, and it has little overexposure latitude owing to the upswept curve.

It would be interesting to try a POTA developer, which I have never done.

I have a little of this stock still left but it is now so old that the latent image edge printing and edge numbers have disappeared!
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#17 John Sprung

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Posted 25 June 2007 - 01:35 PM

Not too slow, the TV guys used to shoot from a P31 Phospher CRT and then quicly develop the film and telecine it to show the same program in the next time zone. Probaly in half hour chunks, and the nagative would have been packed two rolls in a 35mm can.

Beofre Vidio tape, the Tv networks were one of Kodaks biggest customers, ....


I have an old movement from an Acme kinescope camera, but it's 35mm. It has an exceptionally fast pulldown, to allow for a 288 degree shutter opening. I doubt that the major networks would have used 16mm for the west coast delay. In any case, this stuff has been obsolete for half a century.

Today they still do pretty much the same thing, only with tape and a satellite feed, rather than film and 32 terrestrial microwave hops.



-- J.S.
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#18 Nick Mulder

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Posted 25 June 2007 - 04:03 PM

I think the D-76 is a bit strong for this stock, I would try D-96 or D-76 diluted 1:1 at about 6 minutes at room temp. The H&D curve is a bit screwy though with no straight line portion so the contrast will depend on how much exposure you give it, more so than other stocks, and it has little overexposure latitude owing to the upswept curve.

It would be interesting to try a POTA developer, which I have never done.

I have a little of this stock still left but it is now so old that the latent image edge printing and edge numbers have disappeared!


Cheers Clive - the POTA does sound interesting, I read about 15-20 stops of latitude just now ...

Phenidone... Just need to find a local supplier
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#19 Nick Mulder

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Posted 25 June 2007 - 11:18 PM

Well - should have some phenidone on the way soon as I have the sodium sulfite here already... Its damn expensive stuff to import directly in small amounts - ie. 100grams which is enough for 33 100' loads using the tanks I have (one dev per soup) ...

But I can order it from the formulary anyhoo ... annoying it has a shelf life of 1 hour huh...

D-76 - thats available here easily ... as is D-94 and D-19 which I have here also in a reasonably large quantity

When you say 1:1 - you mean make a standard D-76 soup and then dilute that mixture 1:1 with water ? - in other words, a near on 1/2 strength soup ?

cheers Clive for your help,
nick
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#20 Clive Tobin

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Posted 28 June 2007 - 08:48 PM

...When you say 1:1 - you mean make a standard D-76 soup and then dilute that mixture 1:1 with water ? ...

Yes.

I don't think it keeps as well as straight D-76 owing to the reduced sulfite.
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