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Lighting outdoor Bike Event


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#1 Graham Aston Burt

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Posted 22 March 2007 - 03:23 PM

Im planning to shoot an outdoor Bmx dirt jumping event on Hdv and I need to figure out the cheapest way to light. Should I be trying to get a good deal on some 1.2k par hmi's or should i consider building my own boards with tungsten floodlamps? Maybe par 64's?

I need some guidance. The entire area is maybe 1000 sq ft. My main factor is budget. Camera is rating i think around 200/250 asa. Need to make the riders pop from the tree lined background

thanks for any ideas
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#2 Tony Brown

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Posted 22 March 2007 - 04:30 PM

Day? Night? I'll assume night ........Is riders vision a consideration or is this all 'to camera' stuff?
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#3 Tony Brown

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Posted 22 March 2007 - 05:24 PM

error>>>
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#4 Graham Aston Burt

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Posted 22 March 2007 - 06:55 PM

error>>>

will be shooting day and night but im thinking that ill use existing light during the day and then have to figure out what do for the night.
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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 22 March 2007 - 07:34 PM

Are there any big poles or something to mount lights to or string cable between? You'd want any lights to be high enough in the air to not get in the riders eye or the camera lens too much. Otherwise you may need some cranes or lifts to put lights in the air.

Assuming you can do that, rows of PAR 64's aren't bad idea if you can create a grid of them, or 9-lights or 12-lights (MaxiBrutes) in each corner/sides of the field up in the air.
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#6 Graham Aston Burt

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Posted 22 March 2007 - 08:20 PM

Are there any big poles or something to mount lights to or string cable between? You'd want any lights to be high enough in the air to not get in the riders eye or the camera lens too much. Otherwise you may need some cranes or lifts to put lights in the air.

Assuming you can do that, rows of PAR 64's aren't bad idea if you can create a grid of them, or 9-lights or 12-lights (MaxiBrutes) in each corner/sides of the field up in the air.



Terex, a construction company makes a small trailer with 4 1k work lamps on it, it has a 30' post to raise them. these would be a cheeper rental then cinema lighting i think. do you think i might have a flicker issue? I doing the whole thing out of my own pocket and i dont have very deep pockets..
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#7 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 22 March 2007 - 08:24 PM

Take your HDV camera over the a site with those lights can see if you have a flicker problem, and if so, if you can find a shutter speed that gets rid of it.
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#8 Tony Brown

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Posted 23 March 2007 - 05:15 AM

I'd consider keeping as many lights IN shot as possible.....
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#9 James Brown

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Posted 23 March 2007 - 08:17 AM

Hi,

How big is the budget? How much power do you have?

Keeping lights in shot is a great idea - Then you can mount a whole bunch of cheap flood lights and not worry too much about hiding them. If you have a big Generaor a Dinette would be great (not sure what you call them: it's, 12 1k par lights) Really high up on a crankavator through some 216 giving a nice soft flood. A couple of 1.2's wouldnt do it. Maybe a couple of 4k's
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#10 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 23 March 2007 - 08:19 AM

Then you may get into the problem of the riders coming over a hill and staring into your lights, hence why I think higher is better, safety-wise.
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#11 Tony Brown

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Posted 23 March 2007 - 09:21 AM

Then you may get into the problem of the riders coming over a hill and staring into your lights, hence why I think higher is better, safety-wise.


Yes obviously a degree of common sense is required here, if the event is of any worth there will be a safety marshall of some kind who represents the riders interest. If only as a courtesy (probably a requirememnt of shooting anyway), get them and or the riders involved to verbally sign off what you're intending. But there will I'm sure be areas where the lights can be placed low behind riders in shot, to get them in shot and in the riders eyes you'd be filming their arses...... unlikely you intend that.....

Shoot loads of extreme close ups, flashes of colour, flares, pedals, locked up rears, back lit dust slides..... all good stuff to pad the edit and increase the sense of speed
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The Slider

rebotnix Technologies

Willys Widgets

Glidecam

Ritter Battery

Rig Wheels Passport

Abel Cine