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Commercial lighting


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#1 Sakari Suuronen

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Posted 23 March 2007 - 10:25 AM

Hi!

I'd doing this "talking heads" kinda style commercial in a couple weeks and I was thinking if you guys have any tips how to light faces.

There's going to be four different colored backrounds (the colors are not confirmed yet) and basicly the subjects are sitting in a chair and talking about their experiences in a medium close up. The feel is going to be upbeat, fun and colorful. I'm thinking of doing some sort of contrast between the different sets but it can't be too radical.

I'm thinking of putting the tungstens on a dimmer, keying with a 2K, using some fill from the opposite side, possibly one of the dedos I would use as a kicker with some color gel.

I'm hoping that we can have all the different backrounds ready so we can switch the backrounds as fast as we can. We're doing this in one day and once again, we have no budget for anything fancy.

We're shooting on a DVX100, M2+ Canon 1.8 85mm and the lighting package is going to be something like a 2K, some 300W and 650W's couple of 4 bank kinoflows and a set of dedos.

I just got this gig and haven't had any time to think about it so I haven't had the chance to made any plans yet.
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#2 Chad Stockfleth

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Posted 23 March 2007 - 10:33 AM

For your typical "headshot" type thing I like to use a large key either bounced off white cards or through a frame of diffusion, a white card to control fill, sometimes a soft backlight (although personally I am not liking backlights these days) and some sort of semi-hard light as a kicker. You can probably figure out your backgrounds.

These are pretty standard setups and i like to change them around, sometimes keying with kinos wrapped in 216, other times bouncing a 2k off a 4x4 whitecard....sometimes a good old 1k chimera is the way to go.

More important is finding the right angle for your key light that is the most beneficial to the subject. Some people look better more contrasty, some do not. An 1/8 black pro mist can be nice.

Just play around until they look good.
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#3 John Holland

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Posted 23 March 2007 - 12:20 PM

Being still in love with backlight after all these years , my fav. is a large lamp back light , and bounce from front as the "key ? " . It does depend on the set up location etc.


















bein
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#4 Chad Stockfleth

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Posted 23 March 2007 - 12:50 PM

Well, I'm talking about setting up a white card sort of 3/4 to the person and bouncing a light into it to create a large, soft source. Is that peculiar?
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#5 John Holland

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Posted 23 March 2007 - 12:53 PM

No not at all its nice , its just you said you have gone off back light . :D
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#6 Chad Stockfleth

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Posted 23 March 2007 - 01:02 PM

:P Not completely, some shots need it, but I'm trying to keep it low and subtle. The hard backlight is what I'm tired of, especially the warm (i.e. orange) kind. If I need seperation, I'll use one, but I don't want to just put one up because it's normal. Of course if it's motivated, then it should be there.
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#7 Sander van de kerkhof

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Posted 24 March 2007 - 05:48 AM

hi,

This could be me but wouldn't a 2K be a bit much for just a headshot??
I try to keep my light level down to stay around f2.8 to get a nice seperation between the subject and the background.

What i like to do for headshots is a 500w chimera with a grid to give the light some more direction and flag off the spill on the background.

maybe if i feel that the shot needs it i'll put a bounce board on the other side for fill but 9 out of 10 times i won't use any fill.

then use a 300w for backlight with something like 1/2 CTB on it and light the background with a dedo or a 300w fresnel with a gobo and a desired gel to color the background and maybe a dedo to make something in the background pop out a little bit.


it's a pretty basic set-up but it works for me.
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