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Lighting Dilemma


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#1 AJ DeRose

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Posted 23 March 2007 - 03:24 PM

Hey, I'm shooting my final film next week and I have somewhat of a problem.

I'm shooting two tungsten negative stocks (so I have a good latitude) outdoors with the 85 filter. 7212 100ASA (64 w filter) and 7218 500ASA (320 w filter). Where my problem comes in is with the 500t. Most of my outdoor shots will be with the 7212 stock and I should be fine with getting enough light outdoors at my location.

I'm using the 500t in the hall of a convention center. This center links a boardwalk together so it has a great hall that connects one side to the other. I'm not able to light in here so I got a faster film in order to hopefully get enough light from the windows and doors that are constantly open.

Today I went down to my location and took some meter readings to make sure I would have enough light. To my dismay its raining out and its overcast so there wasn't much light to begin with. I took reading at various spots that are important to the film with the incident and got readings of 2.8 at the entrance and 2.8 minus a third at the exit, which is pretty decent. More towards the center I got a split between a 2.8 and a 2 and at some points a little less then a 2. At dead center I got a reading of a 1. I also took a reflected meter reading of the hall (for a wide shot) and got a 1. The ASA was set to a 320, for the 500t film with the 85 filter.

My question is, if I have a fast lens like a wide and I shoot a scene at a 1.4 or 1 stop will I get enough light to have detail for a wide shot. With a normal 25mm lens and a telephoto if I?m wide open for shots that I need in this area will they be pretty decent.

Thanks
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 23 March 2007 - 04:53 PM

It's hard to judge without being there, but it's not always necessary for a subject to be at full "key" exposure so even if you shot at T/2.8 and the center of the room was one-stop underexposed from that, it may look natural that way and actually look overlit if it were fully exposed. It's just something you have to judge by eye.

If you are really in a pinch, exposure-wise, pull the 85 filter and correct the color in post. And if you're really in trouble, push one-stop as well.
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#3 Corey Bringas

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Posted 23 March 2007 - 07:00 PM

the 18 stock is amazing. In fact, sometimes too amazing. It looks into the dark when you don't want it to. You'll be more then fine. I agree with David about pulling the filter. Shoot without them and fix it in post. I've done it before with no problems. Why not shoot 250D? You should be fine, even in the hallway with windows. Can you bounce any light in there via reflectors?
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 23 March 2007 - 07:35 PM

aj1, time to change your Display Name to a real first and last name. Go to My Controls. Thanks.
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