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Snow Exposure


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#1 Joe Baron

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Posted 25 March 2007 - 02:59 PM

I'm shooting exterior footage on Super8 out in the snow this week for a friend. I'm not sure what camera or stock I'll be shooting on (I'll likely find out that day), but I know that there's a built in reflected light meter, and that we'll be using reversal colour film. Also, I'll have a gray card.

Any tips/suggestions on how to get a proper exposure? In the light? In the shade? I just want to be sure that nothing's too over or underexposed (namely the snow), and sadly I won't have the time to shoot any tests.

Thanks for the help!
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#2 Rick Palidwor

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Posted 25 March 2007 - 03:11 PM

I'm shooting exterior footage on Super8 out in the snow this week for a friend. I'm not sure what camera or stock I'll be shooting on (I'll likely find out that day), but I know that there's a built in reflected light meter, and that we'll be using reversal colour film. Also, I'll have a gray card.

Any tips/suggestions on how to get a proper exposure? In the light? In the shade? I just want to be sure that nothing's too over or underexposed (namely the snow), and sadly I won't have the time to shoot any tests.

Thanks for the help!


Use your gray card to get an exposure reading and you should be okay. Take the reading in the same light you are planning to shoot in.

If you took a reading from the general scene and there was a lot of snow in the frame the meter would give you poor advice - underexposure and the snow would be gray. In that situation I would over expose 1 or 2 stops from the reading.

But use your gray card.

And if shooting colour film make sure that filter is in place and even consider additional 85 (orange) filtration on the lens, as winter scenes might be a little more blue than you like.

Rick
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#3 Joe Baron

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Posted 25 March 2007 - 03:19 PM

That's good advice, thanks! I was wondering about the filter and whether I might want to add an additional one. I wish I could test it first to see how warm it is with an 85. I guess I'll just bring one with me and decide then.
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#4 Rick Palidwor

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Posted 25 March 2007 - 05:04 PM

That's good advice, thanks! I was wondering about the filter and whether I might want to add an additional one. I wish I could test it first to see how warm it is with an 85. I guess I'll just bring one with me and decide then.


I have shot winter snow scenes with double 85 (internal and external filter ) and I still wished I'd had a little more, so if in doubt go for it unless somehow your scene would suffer from being too warm.

Rick
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#5 Terry Mester

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Posted 26 March 2007 - 05:27 PM

Click the Link below which contains a couple of Links for Kodak Information Sheets regarding Kodachrome 40 and 25. You'll find interesting Aperture info on those Sheets.
http://www.cinematog.....ic=20939[/url
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Willys Widgets

Broadcast Solutions Inc

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Paralinx LLC

CineLab

rebotnix Technologies

Ritter Battery

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Wooden Camera

Abel Cine