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Tugsten Light Outdoors


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#1 anthony derose

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Posted 25 March 2007 - 11:37 PM

I'm helping a friend out with his bolex 16mm film. Were lighting at night and all he has access to are 3 open face tungsten lights.

I think he will have either 500t or 200t film, so if were using both natural light and tungsten light what type of filter should we use? If its indoor film and we throw on a 85 will that screw up the color coming from the physical lights themselves?

Also in a vice versa situation if were using outdoor film with indoor lights outside is a 80 filter necessary?

I assume you could hook up some CTB gels, or we could shoot without a filter and fix it in post.

Thanks
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 25 March 2007 - 11:59 PM

What "natural" light are you talking about at night?

Generally if you light a night interior or exterior with tungsten lamps, you use tungsten-balanced stocks with no 85 filter.

You would use the 85 filter in daylight-balanced conditions when using tungsten-balanced stocks.

If you are shooting day interiors with natural daylight coming in, then you need to match your tungsten lamps with CTB gels to the daylight if you want to mix them without seeing a big color temp difference. Once you do that, you can then use an 85 filter on the camera lens to convert the daylight coming through the lens to tungsten-balance to match the film stock. Or you can use daylight-balanced stock without an 85 filter.

Generally you wouldn't use daylight-balanced film under tungsten illumination with a 80A correction, because you lose two stops of light with this filter.
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#3 David Sweetman

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Posted 26 March 2007 - 03:43 AM

85 is used to correct sunlight for tungsten stock, so if you're shooting at night, it's not necessary. Unless you want everything to look really orange.

The problem is sunlight is so much hotter in temperature, giving it a bluer color, whereas tungsten is cooler in temperature, giving it a warmer color. So if you're talking about putting Tungsten light onto a Tungsten stock at night, any practicals should render on the film okay, and since you aren't seeing any sunlight, you don't have to worry about a filter.
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