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Exposure Techniques?


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#1 Michael Dean Gibbs

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Posted 27 March 2007 - 12:06 AM

Greetings,

I will be shooting an exterior sequence of three shots, at three different locations, at three slightly varied times of the day.

The first shot is of the actor exiting a train station as she enters a taxi. The second is of the actor as she communicates with the driver. And the third is of her exiting the cab, walking to her destination. I realize that in real time we are talking about 15 minutes max. However, I would like to create the feeling as though, from the first shot to the third shot, the late afternoon is moving quickly towards evening.

Lets assume that I won't be able to actually wait for these exact times of the day to shoot.

I am wondering if there is a technique anyone could bequeath me regarding this. Is it simply a matter of under/overexposing the image as needed?

I eagerly await your replies!

mdg
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#2 Corey Bringas

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Posted 27 March 2007 - 12:39 AM

Personally I'd expose correctly and change the lighting/mood in telecine. Tell the colorist your plans and they'll easily accommodate you. There's option number one...
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 27 March 2007 - 01:47 AM

I agree, it's not really an exposure issue, it's a quality of light issue. If she steps out of that cab in the end under high noon harsh sunlight, all the timing in the world isn't going to realistically make that look like early evening.

First I'd decide what the two ends of the sequence look like, i.e. does it begin in low, warm late afternoon light when she gets into the taxi and end with her exiting the cab in deep blue twilight? The middle part inside the cab could be faked more by using a shallow depth of field to keep the background out of focus, driving in the shadow side of buildings and trees, etc.
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#4 william koon

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Posted 27 March 2007 - 08:27 PM

I agree, it's not really an exposure issue, it's a quality of light issue. If she steps out of that cab in the end under high noon harsh sunlight, all the timing in the world isn't going to realistically make that look like early evening.

First I'd decide what the two ends of the sequence look like, i.e. does it begin in low, warm late afternoon light when she gets into the taxi and end with her exiting the cab in deep blue twilight? The middle part inside the cab could be faked more by using a shallow depth of field to keep the background out of focus, driving in the shadow side of buildings and trees, etc.

David,
What are the options to achieve 'shallow depth of field' if I have to shoot inside the cab? thanks
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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 27 March 2007 - 10:34 PM

David,
What are the options to achieve 'shallow depth of field' if I have to shoot inside the cab? thanks


Shooting at a wide lens aperture, using ND filters if necessary.
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#6 Michael Dean Gibbs

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Posted 28 March 2007 - 12:44 PM

Thank you for the help gentleman!

David, if I still have your attention, I have another question for you that I could use your expertise on.

My lead actress is wandering through a collectibles shop looking for the perfect gift for her idol (Kate Hepburn). As the camera pans with her movement, she sees a "glimmer" of light from the collectible that will eventually become the gift she gives Kate.
How could I realistically create this "glimmer" of light. I thought about strategically placing a light such that, as the camera pans/dollys (her POV), at some point the camera will reach the exact angle and a flare will be created, hence the "glimmer".

If you or anyone else has any imput, it would be much appreciated!!

mdg
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#7 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 28 March 2007 - 05:12 PM

If it's an object that is reflective, you would use a small but intense spotlight at the correct angle for a kick back into the lens. If the object is translucent, shining a small light through it may also work, though it may be less motivated.
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#8 Frank Barrera

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Posted 28 March 2007 - 07:13 PM

My lead actress is wandering through a collectibles shop looking for the perfect gift for her idol (Kate Hepburn). As the camera pans with her movement, she sees a "glimmer" of light from the collectible that will eventually become the gift she gives Kate.

you could try using a star filter for the shot that reveals the object. in conjunction with having a special light just for the object you will get a nice star pattern glint. it's a bit over-the-top but might be correct in your situation. the only challenge is isolating ALL hot spot reflections as they will ALL have the star filter effect.
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#9 alfredoparra

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Posted 29 March 2007 - 11:35 PM

post the clip here when your done so we can see it, I want to see how well all the advice you got played out on your set, these guys in here are experts!
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#10 Rupe Whiteman

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Posted 30 March 2007 - 10:44 AM

Try using a small spot source and bouncing it off a hand mirror - this gives you a good control over the effect as you can move/pan the light source or rotate the mirror at will...
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#11 Chris Keth

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Posted 30 March 2007 - 01:14 PM

Try using a small spot source and bouncing it off a hand mirror - this gives you a good control over the effect as you can move/pan the light source or rotate the mirror at will...


I would go for this, personally. You can light the object by bouncing off of a little inspection mirror. The mirror can then be turned to "turn off" the special on the object and turned right at the moment you want the glint from the object.
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Glidecam

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