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lighting for video


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#1 william koon

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Posted 27 March 2007 - 08:49 PM

I noticed that most of the lightings done for video shoot used diffused lights. Does this mean that direct or naked lights are not suitable?
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#2 Frank Barrera

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Posted 27 March 2007 - 09:15 PM

I noticed that most of the lightings done for video shoot used diffused lights. Does this mean that direct or naked lights are not suitable?

The truth is that most lighting for video and film nowadays is soft diffused lighting. that is a whole topic unto itself. but to answer your question: no. it is perfectly suitable to use hard lighting when shooting video. it is perfectly suitable to use any type of lighting that your subject matter calls for regardless of your capture medium.
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#3 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 28 March 2007 - 04:52 PM

When shooting video and I'm using a simple SINGLE SOURCE setup, I tend to use diffusion more than I do with film. I feel with video I need the wrap around of diffused lighting to pick-up more detail in the shadows of my subjects' faces. Whereas with film it can be a bit easier to bring up that detail.

Plus, film can handle the hot highlights a lot better than video...another reason why diffusion is especially preferred in video. In video, you won't have to worry as much about losing detail in your highlights if the reflectance/glare is kept soft and subtle with diffused lighting.

But that's just IMHO

:)
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#4 Brian Dzyak

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Posted 28 March 2007 - 08:22 PM

I concur. The problem with hard undiffused light is that most video doesn't have the exposure latitude that film does so you'll either have contrast problems or you wind up using more units as fill. When I use a large diffused key (Chimera), I can get away with one light for key and fill instead of putting up two (small diffusion on the key or no diffusion + another unit or bounce on the other side for fill).

The basic trick to video is knowing the parameters and working within them. It's not a liability just as you don't think of daylight film stock as a liability when you shoot a movie. Just know the limits of exposure then work to keep the entire range within four or five stops (when possible). Particularly on an interior set when you have full control, using diffused light helps to accomplish that.
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