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Does Kodak 7299 ever go through a camera?


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#1 Jim Feldspar

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Posted 30 March 2007 - 09:40 PM

From Kodak site: "FILM-TO-VIDEO TRANSFERS
KODAK VISION2 HD Color Scan Film 7299 is intended exclusively for telecine transfer using the KODAK VISION2 HD Digital Processor."

I don't understand this. It says on the site that cinematographers can expose this 500 ASA (Daylight)
320 ASA (Tungsten) so do they shoot with this film when they absolutely are going to video/DVD and
never going to project? It sounds like this goes through a camera but then it sounds like maybe it doesn't.

I looked but couldn't find a picture of the HD Digital Processor. How does this workflow work?

Thanks.
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 30 March 2007 - 09:50 PM

It's a low-con camera negative stock designed for telecine / scanning only after being processing. It's missing some of the masking for getting a good color-balanced print off of the negative. The digital processor has some presets looks meant to make this stock look like other stocks, but you could probably do this by spending a little more time playing with the controls of the color-corrector.
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#3 Jim Feldspar

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Posted 31 March 2007 - 04:57 AM

It's a low-con camera negative stock designed for telecine / scanning only after being processing. It's missing some of the masking for getting a good color-balanced print off of the negative. The digital processor has some presets looks meant to make this stock look like other stocks, but you could probably do this by spending a little more time playing with the controls of the color-corrector.


Hmmm...sounds like it's one way to do something that people probably already get done another
way anyway, perhaps with some pros and cons.

Thanks for clearing up that it is a camera stock! Maybe I was a little slow at the end of the week
but I wasn't sure. Appreciate it!
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 31 March 2007 - 10:02 AM

Hmmm...sounds like it's one way to do something that people probably already get done another
way anyway, perhaps with some pros and cons.


Well, that's sort of one problem with the concept -- if you want it to look like '18, why not shoot '18?

But some DP's like the tremendously wide latitude of '99 for telecine work. Personally, I think it's a bit soft & grainy in Super-16; I wish they had made a slow-speed version of it, but then they couldn't sell it as a "one stock does it all" product.
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#5 K Borowski

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Posted 03 April 2007 - 04:59 PM

But some DP's like the tremendously wide latitude of '99 for telecine work. Personally, I think it's a bit soft & grainy in Super-16; I wish they had made a slow-speed version of it, but then they couldn't sell it as a "one stock does it all" product.


Sorry, didn't see your post until just now. According to an issue of the Kodak "On Film" or somethign like that magazine, "The Shield" is now shot exclusively on '99. There is also a director that got Kodak to make it in 35mm, so it is available in 35mm, although only by special order. I hope it sticks around. I've never had an opportunity to work with the Primetime film Kodak used to make, but I have heard this stock is much improved over that one.

If rated at maybe EI 320, I think one could get some tighter grain out of it. I doubt The Shield would be the type of show to underrate their stock, as they really embrace the grainy look. The show's producer says that they aspire to make every shot look like "Vietnam War Footage". If so they've done an excellent job through the use of '99 in attaining that look.

~Karl
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