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SKIP bleach + PUSH process = ?


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#1 Rajavel Olhiveeran

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Posted 31 March 2007 - 02:09 AM

hi all
i had earlier skip bleach processed directly on the negative for a small flash-back sequence. it worked interestingly. though the exterior shots were little blown out more than i expected....

how will a negative react if i am gonna under expose by two stops and combine the SKIP bleach process with the 2 stops PUSH process???

normally push process saturate the colors right? how do we achieve the High contrast + high color saturation chris doyle's films!!
thanks cheers!!
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 31 March 2007 - 10:08 AM

You wouldn't skip bleach, that's for sure -- that lowers saturation. You're leaving black silver in all the color layers.

Doyle basically pushed-processed a 250T stock for that saturated contasty look, plus shot saturated subjects in colored lighting. At least that's how he shot "Fallen Angels". He didn't skip-bleach. And it's debatable whether push-processing really improves saturation as opposed to simply getting a denser negative and printing it down.

In other words, if you exposed normally and pushed one stop and thus had a negative that was one-stop overexposed, then printed that down, would it look any more saturated than a negative that was overexposed one-stop, processed normally, and printed down? Is it the pushing or the extra negative density that is improving the color saturation in the print?

Cross-processing an E6 reversal stock like 5285 would get you super high contrast, high saturation.
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#3 Rajavel Olhiveeran

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Posted 31 March 2007 - 12:31 PM

You wouldn't skip bleach, that's for sure -- that lowers saturation. You're leaving black silver in all the color layers.

Doyle basically pushed-processed a 250T stock for that saturated contasty look, plus shot saturated subjects in colored lighting. At least that's how he shot "Fallen Angels". He didn't skip-bleach. And it's debatable whether push-processing really improves saturation as opposed to simply getting a denser negative and printing it down.

In other words, if you exposed normally and pushed one stop and thus had a negative that was one-stop overexposed, then printed that down, would it look any more saturated than a negative that was overexposed one-stop, processed normally, and printed down? Is it the pushing or the extra negative density that is improving the color saturation in the print?

Cross-processing an E6 reversal stock like 5285 would get you super high contrast, high saturation.


THANKS MR.DAVID
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#4 Michael Nash

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Posted 01 April 2007 - 12:12 AM

For more info:

http://www.cameragui...ting_limits.htm
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#5 Jon Kukla

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Posted 01 April 2007 - 06:27 AM

And remember that if you DO ever use skip bleach, you need to underexpose the film by about a stop (and beef up your fill light).
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Wooden Camera

Aerial Filmworks

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rebotnix Technologies

FJS International, LLC

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CineLab

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Ritter Battery

Technodolly

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Glidecam

Willys Widgets

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Tai Audio