Jump to content


Photo

Artist Statement


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 Corey Bringas

Corey Bringas
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 50 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 02 April 2007 - 01:47 PM

Hey Everyone,

For my advanced cinematography class I am required to write an artist statement. Unfortunately I was shooting during the class day in which my professor reviewed them. I have found some examples which my peers have made but was wondering if any of you had statements in which I could reference or even specific tips regarding what I should include in an artist statement.
Thank you for your help,
Corey
  • 0

#2 Dan Salzmann

Dan Salzmann
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1143 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Paris, France

Posted 02 April 2007 - 06:02 PM

Boodles with ice and a slice.
  • 0

#3 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19765 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 02 April 2007 - 08:24 PM

For my advanced cinematography class I am required to write an artist statement.


For a specific project, a conceptual statement ala what Storaro writes before every show? Or some sort of personal mission statement, the horrible type that you find yourself writing when applying to college?
  • 0

#4 Dan Salzmann

Dan Salzmann
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1143 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Paris, France

Posted 03 April 2007 - 02:51 AM

Have mercy and save everyone from the 27 millionth "painting with light" manifesto.
  • 0

#5 Rupe Whiteman

Rupe Whiteman
  • Sustaining Members
  • 336 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 03 April 2007 - 07:58 AM

I light therefore I am... B)
  • 0

#6 Alex Haspel

Alex Haspel
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 282 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • vienna, austria

Posted 03 April 2007 - 09:00 AM

"ich schwenke, also bin ich"

only funny in german tho...

could probably be translated to "i pan therefor i am" ...

Edited by Alex Haspel, 03 April 2007 - 09:01 AM.

  • 0

#7 Corey Bringas

Corey Bringas
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 50 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 03 April 2007 - 01:14 PM

For a specific project, a conceptual statement ala what Storaro writes before every show? Or some sort of personal mission statement, the horrible type that you find yourself writing when applying to college?

Hey David,
Thanks for the reply. It's the horrible type- the kind our professor thinks we'll eventually throw on our websites. I wrote a rough one yesterday which he critiqued. Seems he wants kind of a bio/artist statement mix. Oh well. Just wondering if you used them, and if you had any examples/ thoughts on what makes a good one.
  • 0

#8 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19765 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 03 April 2007 - 02:25 PM

It's hard to avoid cliches like "my style will serve the story", etc. Otherwise you find yourself advocating a particular stylistic approach regardless of content, which is not really what most modern cinematographers do unless they are constantly asked to repeat themselves.
  • 0

#9 David Sweetman

David Sweetman
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 757 posts
  • Student

Posted 03 April 2007 - 02:48 PM

For this kind of stuff I like giving the teacher something he's not expecting. Since it's supposed to be intensely personal, it's not something he can justifiably grade you down on. I'd probably explain that I was a monist who believed everything was made of light. Kind of like Heraclitus who said everything was made of fire. So then the job of the cinematographer is the truest form of existence itself, it's man, who is made of light, fulfilling his most natural function. (yeah, they usually grade me down anyway.)
  • 0

#10 Mariano Nante

Mariano Nante
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 109 posts
  • Other

Posted 03 April 2007 - 03:20 PM

Although he is not a cinematographer, Béla Tarr has written a very interesting Artist Statement.


Right at the center of a seemingly incomprehensible world, at the age of 32, the question "why do I make films" seems unanswerable. I don't know.

All I know is that I can't make films if people don't let me. If I don't receive trust and funding I feel like I don't exist. The last one-and-a-half to two years of my life went by in just such a state of apparent futility - I was given no opportunities to realize my plans through the official channels. Two courses of action were left open to me: to gradually suffocate or search for some alternative. Then followed a terrible year of begging for money and trying to discover whether it's even possible to make a different type of film in Hungary, one that doesn't depend on the official and traditional sources of funding. And once the money's finally all there and I've managed to create some small opportunity, kidding myself that I'm "independent," that's when it hits me that there's no such thing as independence or freedom, only money and politics. You can never escape anything. Those who give you money also threaten you. All that remains is obligation. The film has to be made. Then you desperately clutch onto the camera, as if it were the last custodian of the truth that you had supposed existed. But what to film if everything is a lie? All I can be is an apologist for lies, treachery and dishonor.

But in that case, why make films?

This also leads to internal conflicts, as my self-confidence wanes, the crew start to leave because the venture appears uncertain and I can't pay them enough. And I am left with a general feeling of anxiety. So I flee from this form of desperation into another - the film.

Probably, I make films in order to tempt fate, to simultaneously be the most humiliated and, if only for a few moments, the freest person in the world. Because I despise stories, as they mislead people into believing that something has happened. In fact, nothing really happens as we flee from one condition to another. Because today there are only states of being - all stories have become obsolete and cliched, and have resolved themselves. All that remains is time. This is probably the only thing that's still genuine - time itself: the years, days, hours, minutes and seconds. And film time has also ceased to exist, since the film itself has ceased to exist. Luckily there is no authentic form or current fashion. Some kind of massive introversion, a searching of our own souls can help ease the situation.

Or kill us.

We could die of not being able to make films, or we could die from making films.

But there's no escape.

Because films are our only means of authenticating our lives. Eventually nothing remains of us except our films - strips of celluloid on which our shadows wander in search of truth and humanity until the end of time.

I really don't know why I make films.

Perhaps to survive, because I'd still like to live, at least just a little longer....


-Bela Tarr, during preproduction for Damnation, 1987


Hope it helps!
  • 0

#11 Nick Mulder

Nick Mulder
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1023 posts
  • Other
  • Auckland, New Zealand

Posted 03 April 2007 - 04:01 PM

Hand in a spade - he'll either ask what it is or wont.
  • 0


Technodolly

Metropolis Post

Wooden Camera

CineLab

Abel Cine

Ritter Battery

Glidecam

rebotnix Technologies

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Rig Wheels Passport

Aerial Filmworks

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineTape

FJS International, LLC

The Slider

Willys Widgets

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Tai Audio

Paralinx LLC

Visual Products

Opal

CineLab

Glidecam

Abel Cine

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

The Slider

Rig Wheels Passport

Tai Audio

Ritter Battery

Willys Widgets

Technodolly

FJS International, LLC

rebotnix Technologies

Wooden Camera

Paralinx LLC

CineTape

Visual Products

Opal

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Aerial Filmworks

Metropolis Post

Gamma Ray Digital Inc