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tips/experiences for our first movie...


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#1 seth christian

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Posted 06 April 2007 - 03:47 PM

we are working out a script for a movie we would like to shoot this
later fall,07. and this would be our first full feature. we've actually
got a B Actor through a connection that is interested in doing it...which
is our main force behind taking it to the next level.

will be NEW at finding buyers/investors, etc...

movie context: comedy. and, at this point we've really come to the
decision that if we actually want to try and sell this....its gotta be in
35mm (at minimum, 16mm) NO VIDEO! unless anyone has anything
to say about this theory/method......all ears!

any help how to approach these issues would be invaluable!

thanks yall
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#2 Dory Breaux DP

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Posted 06 April 2007 - 03:51 PM

I'd sugjest considering shooting S16 and blowing up to 35 if your going to do a theatrical release... Other then that, I cant realy help you with investors and such, sorry.
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#3 seth christian

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Posted 06 April 2007 - 11:53 PM

[quote
I'd sugjest considering shooting S16 and blowing up to 35 if your going to do a theatrical release...]


because its quite a bit cheaper to shoot 16 and blow up to 35???
I thought blow up was really expensive.


Plus, there's the quality issue, starting off with 35 sure boosts the quality level in trying to promote
it and sell it. doesn't it?

thanks for your time
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#4 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 07 April 2007 - 03:46 AM

"No John, I dont care HOW cool HD is, fil is still better. Just cause you waist your money on fruit juce doesnt mean you can complane about my shooting 16mm"-- Dory Breaux discussing film with John Glasco


You quoted yourself? :blink:

Edited by James Steven Beverly, 07 April 2007 - 03:47 AM.

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#5 Saba Mazloum

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Posted 07 April 2007 - 08:52 AM

I would say shoot the feature with HD( F900, Vaircam), i just finished working as a 1sAC on a feature which was shot on the HD Sony F900, and it looked great. If you have a talented DP who can light well, then go with HD. Its cheaper, and in the end it all depends on your story, 35mm wont make your story amazing...
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#6 Sidney King

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Posted 07 April 2007 - 03:29 PM

There are many factors that affect a completed film's sales potential, and truthfully, origination format is fairly low on the list (things like name actor involvement, exposure at the major festivals, and general market trends are much more important). It all depends on how you plan to position your film in the marketplace (genre, potential distribution streams, etc...).

There are a lot of moving parts to consider, and the marketplace changes quickly. To really explore the business side of things and how your origination format fits into the equation, I would recommend you talk to experienced producers, sales agents, distributors, producers' reps...people who buy and sell films for a living.

Good luck!
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#7 Dan Goldberg

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Posted 15 April 2007 - 01:10 PM

what's your budget like? Because that'll determine a lot of things that you should or shouldn't do.
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Paralinx LLC

Abel Cine

Tai Audio

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Aerial Filmworks

The Slider

Ritter Battery

Rig Wheels Passport

Technodolly

Metropolis Post

Willys Widgets

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

FJS International, LLC

CineTape

Wooden Camera

Visual Products

CineLab

Glidecam

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Opal