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#1 Chayse Irvin

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Posted 08 April 2007 - 03:47 PM

I was watching a bit of Munich today and one of the favorite shots in the film is this one :: Munich ::
What kind of different techniques there are to expose for glass reflections?
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#2 Jaan Shenberger

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Posted 08 April 2007 - 04:32 PM

spot meter from the same angle as the camera lens... and obviously, the three factors involved are how well-illuminated the subject is, how dark the area behind the glass is, and how reflective the glass/material is. and also, use no pola.

Edited by Jaan Shenberger, 08 April 2007 - 04:33 PM.

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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 08 April 2007 - 05:18 PM

To some degree, it's something you can judge by eye in terms of how well the reflection reads. You lose a lot of exposure when reflecting the image off of glass, and it helps to not have a bright background behind the glass (a black background giving you the strongest reflections and a white background the worst).

You can see in the clip that the backlight on the actor is maybe two stops over or more, to create a reflection in the glass that looks about one-stop under.

This is a scenario where actually the video tap image from the film camera, no matter how crappy it is, can tell you whether you are getting a good balance for a reflection gag.
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#4 Phil Gerke

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Posted 09 April 2007 - 03:56 PM

Also notice that they put his face on the darkest part of the room. Framed any way else and they would have been in trouble.

Good post, thanks.
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#5 Daniel Smith

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Posted 10 April 2007 - 07:40 PM

I'd be interested to know what kind of a setup you would need to expose for night scenes like that. Any ideas?
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#6 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 11 April 2007 - 12:33 AM

I'd be interested to know what kind of a setup you would need to expose for night scenes like that. Any ideas?


It's a rather complicated lighting set-up. The store interior is mainly by its practical lamps with a added few spots, maybe something like Tweenies (650w) or smaller, the backlight on the lead that creates the reflection could be a semi-spotted 1K tungsten. But the streets & buildings themselves are lit with a lot of big units hidden behind buildings and whatnot.
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Visual Products

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CineTape

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

rebotnix Technologies

Opal

Paralinx LLC

Aerial Filmworks

CineLab

Tai Audio

Technodolly

Metropolis Post

Ritter Battery

Willys Widgets

Wooden Camera

Rig Wheels Passport

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Abel Cine