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Super 8 to 35mm


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#1 Gary McClurg

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Posted 11 April 2007 - 10:45 AM

A friend emailed me the other day...

And asked me about this... instead of shooting with the prosumer HD cameras...

Shoot with Super 8...
Transfer to HD
Then output to 35mm

My first thought the transfer costs alone you might as well shoot film...

He still wanted to know could it work... its been a long time since I checked up on it... but I believe it was grain due to the size of the stock itself... and a few other things that I can't remember...

He did say he called DuArt in New York that list it as a service... but every time he called the tech guy was out or off...

Also he asked what if you where only going to HD... the odds of getting a film out on a small budget picture are pretty high... would the Super 8 still be better than a prosumer HD camera...

Wondering if any one else had any thoughts or opinions on the subject...

Thanks in advance...

Edited by Gary McClurg, 11 April 2007 - 10:47 AM.

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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 11 April 2007 - 10:51 AM

Sure, it's possible if you can find someone that can transfer Super-8 to 24P HD -- there are only a few facilities that offer the service. Yes, it would probably be more expensive than using a prosumer HDV camcorder. Yes, it would be grainier than HDV photography but you don't shoot Super-8 for fine-grained images projected on the big screen (on a little TV screen, you may be able to get it to look not so grainy).

Basically he has to decide if he wants the look of Super-8 versus HDV and what he can afford, but it certainly is technically possible.
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#3 Gary McClurg

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Posted 11 April 2007 - 10:58 AM

Thanks David for both answers here and on the Dalsa...

Pretty much the cost factor I was telling him would eat him up... more than can it be done...
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#4 Douglas Hunter

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Posted 11 April 2007 - 02:29 PM

He did say he called DuArt in New York that list it as a service... but every time he called the tech guy was out or off...



About 8 years ago I saw a short film that had some footage that was shot on 8mm then opticaly blown up to 35mm that was done at DuArt. The results worked well for that film. Why does your friend want to use an HD intermediate, rather than an optical?
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#5 Gary McClurg

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Posted 13 April 2007 - 08:52 PM

About 8 years ago I saw a short film that had some footage that was shot on 8mm then opticaly blown up to 35mm that was done at DuArt. The results worked well for that film. Why does your friend want to use an HD intermediate, rather than an optical?



One thing is the odds of going to a 35mm film out on a smaller film is pretty high... but you never know... everythng might click and you got a winner on your hands... in the sense that it made it to the big screen...

I guess he just like the look of film... but sometimes looking at the prices... it seems like you might as well shoot 16mm...

There's also a thread on two per... this could be the way to go... for him...
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#6 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 13 April 2007 - 10:23 PM

Perhaps the most cost effective way to do it would be to actually physically cut the film and then do the blow-up to 35mm. I'd recommend the anamorphic set-up that would squeeze the image vertically when shooting, then have it unsqueezed during the blow-up to 35mm so it actually fills the entire 35mm frame, or you could try enlarging the super-8 frame by widening the aperture.

The biggest drawback in cutting the actual film, besides the scratches and dust, would be shooting on reversal instead of negative and having less latitude to work with. I had a super-8 film blown up to 16mm and it came out nice.
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#7 Hugues Wisniewski

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Posted 14 April 2007 - 02:07 AM

You might be interested in this article about THE HALOGENUROS PROJECT
with a few grabs of super 8 mm digitized in 2K posted here
I haven't seen the film or a short clip from it so if anyone knows how and where we can watch this film, please, let me know!

Hugues
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#8 steve hyde

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Posted 17 April 2007 - 12:23 AM

...I think there is lots of potential for S8 to 35mm blow ups these days, but I would only do it for a short-form film or short segments for a longer form film. If you want something that looks ultra filmic and grainy this would be a nice technique. These days with HD filmouts on Arri Laser machines and fine-grain color negative stocks I see lots of potential for this -especially in the domain of close-up photography where grain is often welcome..... at least to my eyes.

Steve
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