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Very Sharp, Low Contrast Stock Needed


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#1 Fernando Nicolas

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Posted 16 April 2007 - 12:57 PM

Nearly all daytime exteriors...Super 16mm...I don't want any grain. Thank you.
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#2 Adam Frisch FSF

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Posted 16 April 2007 - 05:06 PM

It doesn't exist, unfortunately. For some reason it's not possible to make slow, fine-grained filmstocks have low contrast.

Kodak's 50D or Fuji's 64D will be sharp enough in 16mm (16mm grain is not very visible at all these days on a sharp telecine). And the contrast can always be taken down in TK or with the use of some Low Con/Ultra Con filters (or flashing, but that's a can of worms) or with the use of the Varicon attachment from Arri.
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#3 Jarin Blaschke

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Posted 17 April 2007 - 07:57 PM

It doesn't exist, unfortunately. For some reason it's not possible to make slow, fine-grained filmstocks have low contrast.

Kodak's 50D or Fuji's 64D will be sharp enough in 16mm (16mm grain is not very visible at all these days on a sharp telecine). And the contrast can always be taken down in TK or with the use of some Low Con/Ultra Con filters (or flashing, but that's a can of worms) or with the use of the Varicon attachment from Arri.



Take the 50D and pull it a stop. For really tight grain, pull it a stop and rate it at e.i. 16.
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#4 Tim Jones

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Posted 21 April 2007 - 12:04 AM

Not really a practical suggestion, what about 3234? it's polyester, winding A, minimum order 12,000 feet and probably doesn't have an antihalation layer but it definitely seems to be fine-grained and low contrast from the curves. (I've never used it.) the acetate version is only available in double-perf. and it's sloooooow.

I think low-contrast fine grain films are possible, but they have to be very, very slow. Panchromatic separation film is another good example, but it doesn't come in 16mm.

The practical option is definitely to use VISION2 50D and change to B+W in post production. I think "The Man Who Wasn't There" was made on color film.
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#5 Rodrigo Llano

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Posted 21 April 2007 - 11:45 AM

I think "The Man Who Wasn't There" was made on color film.



I think you are right Tim. They decided use color film not because a contrast or grain option (in first option) but an production requirement. The "production" don't believe in B&W movies and don't want to give money for B&W stock but Coen Bro. know how the picture must look like.. Deakins did a great job working in color to desaturate in post..

Rodrigo
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#6 Dory Breaux DP

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Posted 27 April 2007 - 05:08 PM

Reduce contrast in post.
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