Jump to content


Photo

Testing filters on stills film


  • Please log in to reply
2 replies to this topic

#1 Dan McCormick

Dan McCormick
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 31 posts
  • Student

Posted 18 April 2007 - 05:44 AM

Hi

I'm a student, and I'm shooting a short film in a couple of weeks. I don't have the money to do any testing properly, so I want to go to the location and test using a 35mm SLR. The only thing I'm trying to find out is the effect of filters, definitely lo-cons, polarizers (for the sky rather than getting rid of reflections) and some warming filters, like a chocolate or tobacco.

I'm going to shoot on Kodak Vision 2 50D, I was wondering if there are any specific 35mm stills films that would replicate this better than others. The slowest I can find is a 100ASA Fuji, but would I be better off with a 200/400ASA Kodak for the colour differences, or am I wasting my time and none of them replicate 50D better than any others.

Thanks

Dan McCormick
  • 0

#2 Patrick Cooper

Patrick Cooper
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 908 posts
  • Other

Posted 18 April 2007 - 08:53 AM

If testing out with still film, it might be preferable to use slide film for more consistent colours. There are a lot of variables that can occur with the processing and printing of negative film and in some cases, the effects of the colour filters might be reduced or cancelled out during the printing process. For example, if you took the same negative to 7 different labs to be printed, you will likely get 7 different results with regards to colour. Although some variation can occur with different labs' processing of slide film, it is no where near as severe as the printed results from negative film. With slide film, what you expose on film is pretty much what you get with regards to colour and exposure.

Select a slow speed or medium speed 100asa Kodak slide film. I'm not up to date with the latest Kodak transparency films but as far as I am aware, Kodachrome 64 is still available but might he hard to get hold of. I don't know if Kodak Elitechrome 100 is still being produced. There is also that other 100asa Kodak slide emulsion which is the still version of Ektachrome 100D cine film. Obviously, each of these films will give you a different 'look' but you should still get a rough idea of how those filters will look when used with Vision 50D.
  • 0

#3 Hal Smith

Hal Smith
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2280 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • OKC area

Posted 18 April 2007 - 09:35 AM

You'll need to watch lighting ratios using slide film given its limited latitude relative to negative films, the contrast ratios are considerably different. Given that, Kodak E100VS Ektachrome slide film is identical to 5285. Buy some E100VS and you're in business.
  • 0


Glidecam

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Paralinx LLC

rebotnix Technologies

Tai Audio

Abel Cine

Wooden Camera

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineTape

Visual Products

Aerial Filmworks

Ritter Battery

CineLab

FJS International, LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

Willys Widgets

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Metropolis Post

Technodolly

The Slider

Abel Cine

Metropolis Post

The Slider

rebotnix Technologies

Wooden Camera

Aerial Filmworks

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Ritter Battery

Visual Products

Technodolly

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Paralinx LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

FJS International, LLC

Glidecam

CineTape

Tai Audio

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineLab

Willys Widgets