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Remote Eyemo snag


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#1 Zachary Vex

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Posted 19 April 2007 - 01:56 PM

I sent my Eyemo and Revolution intervalometer out with a friend (a popular grip in town) to a remote fire tower in Wisconsin where he's working this week, and although he's loaded it many times before, this time he's having a problem getting the upper feed sprocket to engage the film. He's tried it with some old neg I had and despite having it properly threaded and getting the cover to fit (indicating that the pressure plate release has been re-engaged properly) the film stops moving after 2 frames have fed, and the upper loop is lost. The upper sprocket is turning, he says, but from what he can see, the perfs are not engaged onto the sprocket. When the pressure plate release is engaged, he says that both sprockets seem to move the same distance to get into place for operation. it's all very confusing... when I examine a second Eyemo here, it seems impossible that he is having this problem.

Anyone ever experience anything like this? I wish I could transport myself to Northern Wisconsin for a few minutes to look at it for myself.
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#2 Robert Houllahan

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Posted 19 April 2007 - 02:46 PM

I sent my Eyemo and Revolution intervalometer out with a friend (a popular grip in town) to a remote fire tower in Wisconsin where he's working this week, and although he's loaded it many times before, this time he's having a problem getting the upper feed sprocket to engage the film. He's tried it with some old neg I had and despite having it properly threaded and getting the cover to fit (indicating that the pressure plate release has been re-engaged properly) the film stops moving after 2 frames have fed, and the upper loop is lost. The upper sprocket is turning, he says, but from what he can see, the perfs are not engaged onto the sprocket. When the pressure plate release is engaged, he says that both sprockets seem to move the same distance to get into place for operation. it's all very confusing... when I examine a second Eyemo here, it seems impossible that he is having this problem.

Anyone ever experience anything like this? I wish I could transport myself to Northern Wisconsin for a few minutes to look at it for myself.



Sounds to me like the pressure plate slide is not fully engaged and possibly there is something (a rogue perf or two?) stuck in the way keeping the mechanism from sliding all the way forward. The door will not go on unless the slide is all the way forwards as it has a cam on it which engages a tapered piece on the far end of the slide mechanism (towards where the 400' mag goes) did he check and make sure the framerate selector is all the way to 48fps? and if he has a hand crank can he freely hand crank the camera?

Best guess is that if the door will not go on the slide is not all the way engaged.

-Rob-
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#3 Patrick Neary

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Posted 19 April 2007 - 02:46 PM

it really sounds like the perfs aren't engaged by the upper sprocket at loading. As I'm sure you well know, it can be a tricky load (especially if you have grip-fingers :) )if you don't do it often. If the film is being pulled through the gate, and the upper sprocket is rotating, but the upper loop of film is static, then it must be a problem with the film/perfs not being engaged from the get-go.

Hope you get it resolved!

(whoops- Robert beat me to the punch- that's a great idea about checking the door!)
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#4 Robert Houllahan

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Posted 19 April 2007 - 04:08 PM

(whoops- Robert beat me to the punch- that's a great idea about checking the door!)



BTW I have the same rig in a Nikkor mount, very happy with my NCS motor, just picked it up 2 weeks ago.

-Rob-
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#5 Zachary Vex

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Posted 19 April 2007 - 04:15 PM

Mine has the Nikon mount as well. I'll call him with the suggestions that it may be rogue perfs in the way keeping the sprocket from engaging fully. Damn, I was going to send along canned air, but only sent a squeeze blower. I hate that canned air (when the solvent/liquid squirts out it can cause damage) but there's times when it really could come in handy, like at the top of a tall fire tower where you can only haul things up via a pulley system.
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#6 Zachary Vex

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Posted 19 April 2007 - 10:44 PM

Thanks for everyone's suggestions. As it turns out, he didn't pull back the release far enough to open up the sprockets. The bottom one opened, but the top one doesn't fully open until the second click. It's true, the release on the thing requires quite a strong pull to get it open... much more force than you'd think a camera would need applied, but then again, it's a piece of military hardware!

Anyway, he was moderately embarrassed, but the weather was terrible for shooting today anyway so nothing was lost.
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