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Why turn off the optical image stabilser on my pd170?


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#1 JP Frazer

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Posted 24 April 2007 - 06:38 AM

Hi folks,

I recently acquired a pd170 as my first prosumer dvc.

My question is:
Why would you ever want to turn OFF the image stabiliser?

I'm wondering if it creates judder or something during pans or with moving subjects?
Presumaby at some point the stabilser can't keep up and so has to move in steps?
Or can it tell you are e.g. panning and then only stabilise in the vertical?

thanks in advance
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#2 Daniel Smith

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Posted 24 April 2007 - 06:41 PM

Hi folks,

I recently acquired a pd170 as my first prosumer dvc.

My question is:
Why would you ever want to turn OFF the image stabiliser?

I'm wondering if it creates judder or something during pans or with moving subjects?
Presumaby at some point the stabilser can't keep up and so has to move in steps?
Or can it tell you are e.g. panning and then only stabilise in the vertical?

thanks in advance

Perhaps you don't want such as smooth motion. It wouldn't have worked so well with Danny Boyles 28 Days Later, with all the fast, jerky shots.
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#3 Michael Collier

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Posted 24 April 2007 - 08:54 PM

On tripod shots its very anoying. You should fether your own pans and tilts and not rely on the stabalizer to do it. When I put a camera like that on sticks I always turn it off. It has a tendancy to overshoot, even on the softest fethered stop. It will negate what your doing in the control arm, and once you stop, it will pan a bit, then pan back with the OIS. Also if your used to fethering your pans manually, you get this sense of lag thats really not there. So I find myself constantly fighting it when on sticks. Especially when you get to the longer lenses. I don't know if it adjusts its stabilization rate based on focal length, but most seem too, meaning on sticks with a tight lens, you get a lot of lag.
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#4 JP Frazer

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Posted 25 April 2007 - 05:15 AM

Perhaps you don't want such as smooth motion. It wouldn't have worked so well with Danny Boyles 28 Days Later, with all the fast, jerky shots.


Thanks, good point.

On tripod shots its very anoying. You should fether your own pans and tilts and not rely on the stabalizer to do it. When I put a camera like that on sticks I always turn it off. It has a tendancy to overshoot, even on the softest fethered stop. It will negate what your doing in the control arm, and once you stop, it will pan a bit, then pan back with the OIS. Also if your used to fethering your pans manually, you get this sense of lag thats really not there. So I find myself constantly fighting it when on sticks. Especially when you get to the longer lenses. I don't know if it adjusts its stabilization rate based on focal length, but most seem too, meaning on sticks with a tight lens, you get a lot of lag.


Aaaah! There IS a lag... so that's why the whole thing always felt sluggish/spongy!
I also couldn't understand why my tripod seemed to 'relax' so much at the end of a pan. *DOH*
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#5 Michael Nash

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Posted 25 April 2007 - 10:54 PM

OIS is useful for some situations, but certainly not all. I wouldn't use it unless it really benefitted the shot in some way.

I used the OIS on a DVX100 in a helicopter and it really helped smooth out some of the vibration. But the tradeoff was the periodic "bump" when the floating lens element would hit its limit and return the other direction.
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