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Black or white promist?


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#1 Alberto Díaz

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Posted 25 April 2007 - 10:58 AM

Hi, I´ve been searching information about Black and white promist and I'm not sure about the difference. In wich situations will be better use Black instead White promist?
Could you help me?
Thanks.
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 25 April 2007 - 11:45 AM

Black ProMist filters are just White (or Regular) ProMist filters with an extra layer of black specks to counteract the loss of contrast that the mist particles cause. So they also slightly suppress halation artifacts. This has a tendency to make the Black version look a little more subtle in effect compared to the same strength number regular ProMist (i.e. a #1/4 Black ProMist looks a little less strong than a #1/4 ProMist.)

Personally, I don't use Black ProMists much. When shooting digitally, I can control the loss of black when using regular ProMists by adjusting the Black level in the camera, and thus if the camera tends to have more depth of field, I don't rsik having the black specks start to come into focus, creating a "dirty windshield effect". Plus you can tweak contrast in post color-correction.

Or I'm using ProMists partly as a low-con filter too, so I want the lowering of contrast.

However, Black ProMists are more useful for softening close-ups compared to wider shots, since there is not such a visible change in contrast. So it depends on how much of that "ProMist" effect I want. However, if what I really want is softening more than a misty look, I tend to use other filters like Soft-FX, Black Diffusion-FX, or Classic Soft.
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#3 Matthew Buick

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Posted 25 April 2007 - 04:40 PM

Are Promists physical filters, or digital ones?
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#4 Michael Nash

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Posted 25 April 2007 - 05:25 PM

http://www.tiffen.com/filters.htm
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#5 Matthew Buick

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Posted 25 April 2007 - 06:19 PM

Ah, lovely. I think I'll buy some.
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#6 Michael Nash

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Posted 25 April 2007 - 08:55 PM

Ah, lovely. I think I'll buy some.


Try renting if you can first. That way you can afford to try out the different grades, since the "look" of each filter can change with image content and focal length. For example, it's common to use the lowest density on wider shots and go a little stronger on the closeups. And scenes with a lot of bright areas may glow more visibly than lower-contrast scenes.
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#7 Tim O'Connor

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Posted 27 April 2007 - 04:20 PM

Black ProMist filters are just White (or Regular) ProMist filters with an extra layer of black specks to counteract the loss of contrast that the mist particles cause. So they also slightly suppress halation artifacts. This has a tendency to make the Black version look a little more subtle in effect compared to the same strength number regular ProMist (i.e. a #1/4 Black ProMist looks a little less strong than a #1/4 ProMist.)

Personally, I don't use Black ProMists much. When shooting digitally, I can control the loss of black when using regular ProMists by adjusting the Black level in the camera, and thus if the camera tends to have more depth of field, I don't rsik having the black specks start to come into focus, creating a "dirty windshield effect". Plus you can tweak contrast in post color-correction.

Or I'm using ProMists partly as a low-con filter too, so I want the lowering of contrast.

However, Black ProMists are more useful for softening close-ups compared to wider shots, since there is not such a visible change in contrast. So it depends on how much of that "ProMist" effect I want. However, if what I really want is softening more than a misty look, I tend to use other filters like Soft-FX, Black Diffusion-FX, or Classic Soft.


I suppose that the likely answer to my question is lots of experience but is it posible David that
you could give a quick hit list of how you choose between Soft-FX, Black Diffusion-FX, or Classic
Soft? Thanks.
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#8 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 27 April 2007 - 07:32 PM

Soft-FX still has a slightly misty feel closer to a ProMist, Classic Soft has that gaussian blur feel (out of focus image overlaid on a sharp image) with bubbles or rings around points of light, Black Diffusion FX just softens without any particular look.

I'm currently color-correcting some 35mm-to-HD material and I'm surprised at how subtle but effective the #1/2 Black Diffusion FX filter is. Doesn't look filtered at all. But that's not always a good thing -- halation is one of the prettier but telltale effects of typical diffusion.
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#9 Matthew Buick

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 03:59 PM

Try renting if you can first. That way you can afford to try out the different grades, since the "look" of each filter can change with image content and focal length. For example, it's common to use the lowest density on wider shots and go a little stronger on the closeups. And scenes with a lot of bright areas may glow more visibly than lower-contrast scenes.


Wow. I never thought of renting. I see what you mean, I would only want to use lower density promists. I feel heavier filters look quite garish.

Thanks. ;)
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#10 Ratheesh Ravindran

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Posted 31 May 2007 - 12:44 PM

Personally, I don't use Black ProMists much. When shooting digitally, I can control the loss of black when using regular ProMists by adjusting the Black level in the camera, and thus if the camera tends to have more depth of field, I don't rsik having the black specks start to come into focus, creating a "dirty windshield effect". Plus you can tweak contrast in post color-correction.

hi david,
do you personally prefer to use grad. filters,if the film you are working is finally going through a D.I. process.would you prefer to add the grad. later in the post...?
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#11 Alberto Díaz

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Posted 11 June 2007 - 08:04 AM

Personally, I don't use Black ProMists much. When shooting digitally, I can control the loss of black when using regular ProMists by adjusting the Black level in the camera, and thus if the camera tends to have more depth of field, I don't rsik having the black specks start to come into focus, creating a "dirty windshield effect". Plus you can tweak contrast in post color-correction.


Hi Ratheesh, It's very interesting that you say about black levels. Is it possible to adjust black level in all digital cameras' or only in profesional cameras: Sony HD900,Varicam.... How does it work?

Thanks a lot!
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Gamma Ray Digital Inc

FJS International, LLC

Opal

CineTape

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Metropolis Post

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Wooden Camera

The Slider

Technodolly

Paralinx LLC

Ritter Battery

Willys Widgets

Tai Audio