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Cinematography Quiz


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#1 Zamir Merali

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 12:12 PM

I had some free time and I made this quiz up. It has 10 questions, increasing in difficulty, about cinematography. In the end you get one of 5 ratings of how knowledgeable of a cinematographer you are. Don't try to cheat because each question has a 30 second time limit.

Fixed Quiz

Post your results and enjoy.

Zamir Merali
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#2 Morgan Peline

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 12:32 PM

Hi,

In question 2. you don't state what kind of CT.

And also really after the quiz, you should give he right answers and explain why they are the right answers...
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#3 Dan Goldberg

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 12:46 PM

haha thats great lol.

#3 - fire the assistant :lol:
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#4 timHealy

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 01:56 PM

Hi,

In question 2. you don't state what kind of CT.

And also really after the quiz, you should give he right answers and explain why they are the right answers...


I agree.

Tim

Edited by timHealy, 29 April 2007 - 01:57 PM.

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#5 Matthew Buick

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 02:44 PM

5 out of 10. :)
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#6 David Sweetman

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 02:58 PM

In question 2. you don't state what kind of CT.

Yeah, that's kind of important...if you gel it with CTO you're not getting anywhere. Also for question 4, couldn't you just as well spot meter an 18% grey card in front of the actor and wall?

What was the answer for the xenons?
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#7 Zamir Merali

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 03:47 PM

Sorry about that question 2, I meant a C.T blue. The xenon answer was bladerunner.
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#8 Carlos_Martinez

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 06:00 PM

5 0f 10


alot of these questions are kinda bias towards your likes. but either way it was fun i learned some things. ONe thing i dont like about my school is were to cheap to use film so they teach us the whole system. most of students are going for directing and editing and only a few of us are going for an emphasis in cinematography.

OFF TOPIC I KNOW :(
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#9 Sam Wells

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 07:38 PM

# 4 - A spot meter IS a reflective meter. Either answer could be correct.

-Sam
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#10 Ronney Ross

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 07:42 PM

5 out of 10.
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#11 Zamir Merali

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 07:58 PM

# 4 - A spot meter IS a reflective meter. Either answer could be correct.

-Sam

But the correct answer was an incident meter. A reflective meter would make the black grayish and the white darkish.
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#12 Kar Wai Ng

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 08:31 PM

But the correct answer was an incident meter. A reflective meter would make the black grayish and the white darkish.


I'd beg to disagree; I'd use a spot meter so I'd know where I'm pegging the blacks and whites. A reflective meter doesn't "make" blacks grayish or whites darkish; your exposure decisions based on meter readings are what determine that. You can use either meter so long as you know what you're doing. So...there's no correct answer really.
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#13 Zamir Merali

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 08:40 PM

I guess you are right because you can just be aware of the error the reflected meter will make and compensate. However, there no denying that if you use an incident meter by the white dress the shot will be exposed correctly. Also, each answer in the quiz has a certain number of points aloted. If you picked incident you got 2 points but if you picked reflected you got 1. The points are added up in the end and your final rating is selected. So both answers are correct but one could argue that the incident meter answer is more correct.
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#14 Sam Wells

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 09:02 PM

I'd use a spot meter so I'd know where I'm pegging the blacks and whites. A reflective meter doesn't "make" blacks grayish or whites darkish; your exposure decisions based on meter readings are what determine that.


That's how I was thinking :) Like, how hot is that white..... I mean I envisioned this white dress and want to know about it.

Re reading I'd agree though incident might be the best basic answer.

Would depend on if you *could* read anything from the wall..... well I've always got the back of my hand with me ! (I'd take a reading from her face, but she's wearing a veil and the dress is long with long sleeves)

I should stay away from these things :)

-Sam
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#15 Chris Keth

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 09:03 PM

That was fun. I got 8 of 10.

I missed that the filmstock named is a black and white stock (I'm only familiar with 7222 in B&W area) and that Fincher used Deluxe's ACE process. I guessed Technicolor's.
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#16 Kar Wai Ng

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 09:10 PM

However, there no denying that if you use an incident meter by the white dress the shot will be exposed correctly.


Not really. Correct exposure for the white dress is not correlated to what reading you get on your incident meter. You have to make that decision based on the relative luminosities of areas in your frame and the contrast you want. In this case, I'd want to make sure that the luminosity of the white dress fits within the film's latitude; if that means adjusting lighting or shifting your exposure to bias the highlight or shadow, then that's what you do.

It's not as simple as reading off what the incident meter says.
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#17 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 30 April 2007 - 01:25 AM

Teehee. 10/10 :)

Actually, I should have gotten 9/10 because I meant to put CCE process and not ACE on the "Se7en" question. I didn't think the CTB question was confusing at all, but then I've had to take a lot of these tests in film school over the last few years, so maybe I've just gotten good at deciphering ambiguous film tech questions!
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#18 Xavier Plaza

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Posted 30 April 2007 - 02:33 PM

5/10 :( any way i enjoy trivia games jaja

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#19 Daniel Smith

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Posted 30 April 2007 - 03:12 PM

Man I suck...

5/10.

I got caught out on the black and white question. That and I thought a spot meter would be fine.
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#20 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 30 April 2007 - 08:53 PM

Man I suck...

5/10.

I got caught out on the black and white question. That and I thought a spot meter would be fine.

Well, the only reason I knew the B&W question was because the first feature I worked on as a loader was all shot on 7266 and 7222, Tri-X reversal and Double-X negative. I got used to seeing the purple backing on the 7266 and green backing on the 7222 on the magazine's film loop to tell them apart.

The spot meter IS fine if you know how to use it properly -- it assumes that whatever you point it should be 18% grey. If it's not 18% grey (or if you don't want it to be 18% grey), then you have to compensate the exposure reading it gives you accordingly. But these film school-type questions always assume that you will set the f-stop to whatever the meter tells you, so given that the correct answer is "incident meter." If you know too much or too little, you'll aways get these questions wrong! :)
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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

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Abel Cine

Ritter Battery

rebotnix Technologies

CineLab

Glidecam

Visual Products

Rig Wheels Passport

Opal

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Technodolly

Wooden Camera

CineTape

The Slider

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Tai Audio

Paralinx LLC

FJS International, LLC

Willys Widgets