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loading the krasnogorsk


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#1 Molly Corey

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 06:21 PM

So my new super 16 krasnogorsk arrived. i am shocked at how heavy it is with the crystal sync motor and the terrible zoom lens it comes with. The focusing is terrible on the lens. You have to be very far away. I am definitely going to get a wide angle lens. But my question is...how in the world do you load it? i looked online and found the manual at k3camera. but I cannot see those pictures clearly. Does anyone else have a clearer instructions on how to load it? Sorry for my newbie questions, but I am in the dark over here.

Also I ran it for about 5 minutes with no film in it and then read that you should not run it on high with no film. Did I just destroy the camera?

thanks,

molly
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#2 Dory Breaux DP

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 06:58 PM

The lens is fine, its just not any good for macro work or wide stuf realy. Anyway, you should NEVER run any film camera at any more then 24fps without film.
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#3 Sir Alvin Ekarma

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Posted 30 April 2007 - 12:16 AM

i looked online and found the manual at k3camera. but I cannot see those pictures clearly. Does anyone else have a clearer instructions on how to load it? Sorry for my newbie questions, but I am in the dark over here.


Olex has a K3 page w/ some nice clear pix... http://www.geocities...asnogorsk-3.htm
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#4 Nick Mulder

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Posted 30 April 2007 - 12:56 AM

Anyway, you should NEVER run any film camera at any more then 24fps without film.

I've heard this from many people but never exactly why... The usual answer is 'it wears it out' - but what is wearing out exactly? and how, why doesn't it wear out with film in it ?

The claw ? Thats the only moving part that I can think that would be affected by the addition or otherwise of film ... Unless the film creates a friction in the system that without the camera runs too fast and then what ? stops ?

Would love to know... Thinking now of all the times I've been running 60fps+ near the end of a roll and its run out and I cant hear it (shooting concerts) ... Camera still running fine, footage looks great ...
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#5 Patrick Cooper

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Posted 30 April 2007 - 01:22 AM

Ive heard that running a movie camera at high speeds without film can damage the intermittent mechanism. In fact, there was someone who posted on this board who acquired a 16mm camera (can't recall what make) and ran it really fast without film and then suddenly it stopped, and would not run anymore.
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#6 Galen Carter-Jeffrey

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Posted 30 April 2007 - 01:32 AM

Loading the k3 is a nightmare. Count me out. I would rather load a CP-16.
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#7 Nick Mulder

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Posted 30 April 2007 - 02:06 AM

Ive heard that running a movie camera at high speeds without film can damage the intermittent mechanism. In fact, there was someone who posted on this board who acquired a 16mm camera (can't recall what make) and ran it really fast without film and then suddenly it stopped, and would not run anymore.


There are so many different designs (or at least variations of a theme) of 'intermittant mechanisms' which are really just a collection of bits of metal moving around - Aside from wear in which running a camera faster will just relatively increase what happens to an intermittant mechanism when there is no film in it as opposed to when there is ?

That is my question

The camera you mention could have had anything go wrong with it really...

I had a Bolex in peices one day and had disconnected the governor, unknown to me (I really should have known better) it still had a bit of wind left in it and I inadvertantly switched it on - the thing rocketed at a gazillion fps with the forward and reverse claws flapping against each other (no gate installed) - when it came to its stop, the irresistable force met the immovable object and as it turns out the immovable object moved - it sheared right off as a matter of fact (the little thingy thing stopper stop that stops the spring winding down completely)... anyhoo, a $20 part later it was working again - so I understand what happens at an estimatated 300fps + to the camera..

but at 24fps ???
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#8 Patrick Cooper

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Posted 30 April 2007 - 04:00 AM

"The camera you mention could have had anything go wrong with it really..."

You mean it was just a coincidence that the camera stopped working when running at high speed with no film?

The poster stated that previously, he ran the camera at several slow speeds and mid speeds (without film) and without problem. It was only when he ran it at the top speed (without film) that the camera stopped working.
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#9 Nick Mulder

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Posted 30 April 2007 - 04:56 AM

You mean it was just a coincidence that the camera stopped working when running at high speed with no film?

How could I know what went wrong with it ?

I meant what I said >> "The camera you mention could have had anything go wrong with it really"

Ok, it crapped out when it was running high speed, but that doesn't mean that running it at high speed caused the problem ...

I'm not saying it wasn't - I'm just interested in why - like > what is actually happening ?

Did this guy open his camera and try to figure it out ?
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#10 Will Montgomery

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Posted 30 April 2007 - 12:47 PM

Also I ran it for about 5 minutes with no film in it and then read that you should not run it on high with no film.

Is your hand sore? That's about 10 full winds. Made me buy a Scoopic after about a year of that.
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#11 Sir Alvin Ekarma

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Posted 30 April 2007 - 01:01 PM

Anyway, you should NEVER run any film camera at any more then 24fps without film.


When I had my Scoopic, I accidentally ran it at 64fps w/o film and the damn thing froze up. Fortunately, it was fixable...
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#12 Dory Breaux DP

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Posted 30 April 2007 - 03:11 PM

What a bunch of old ladies hahaha! :blink: Loading it is easy, just check out Olex's instructions or the manual over at NCS.
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#13 Andy_Alderslade

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Posted 30 April 2007 - 03:59 PM

But my question is...how in the world do you load it? i looked online and found the manual at k3camera. but I cannot see those pictures clearly. Does anyone else have a clearer instructions on how to load it? Sorry for my newbie questions, but I am in the dark over here.


Use the instructions available on the internet - some are quite decent. Use some expired/gaf film and practice loading it in the light till you know it inside out.

Its really not that hard, as easy as an arri s or bolex. Just make sure you have a sharp pair of scisors to hand if you have try threading it a few times.

Edited by Andy_Alderslade, 30 April 2007 - 04:00 PM.

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#14 Nick Mulder

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Posted 30 April 2007 - 05:11 PM

What a bunch of old ladies hahaha! :blink:

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0316016/

made by a woman in her late 90's ... :P
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#15 Molly Corey

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Posted 01 May 2007 - 02:45 PM

What a bunch of old ladies hahaha! :blink: Loading it is easy, just check out Olex's instructions or the manual over at NCS.



thanks for the great site. i think that should help. but with the super sixteen you use the single sprocket film. should the sprockets go on the inside closer to the camera body or on the outside closer to the lid?
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#16 Dory Breaux DP

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Posted 01 May 2007 - 03:55 PM

thanks for the great site. i think that should help. but with the super sixteen you use the single sprocket film. should the sprockets go on the inside closer to the camera body or on the outside closer to the lid?


Well, there is only one way to put the reel in correctly... That is so the film comes off the bottom.
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#17 Nick Mulder

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Posted 03 May 2007 - 06:32 AM

Well, there is only one way to put the reel in correctly...

Assuming its been wound correctly ... With single-side sprockets there is four ways you could wind your film onto a spool - only one of them correct.

And then you still have two options of the direction to put it in - both of which will have the 'film coming off the bottom' if you want it to (one peeling off clockwise the other anti)

I suggest you simply run your camera at slow speed and watch the gate area - you'll see a little claw thingy going mad at it ... the sprockets will need to on the side of the little mad thingy ...

Edited by Nick Mulder, 03 May 2007 - 06:37 AM.

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#18 Mike Panczenko

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Posted 03 May 2007 - 07:33 AM

In Olex's manual loading instructions, what is the last step telling you to do?
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#19 Clive Tobin

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Posted 03 May 2007 - 11:08 PM

Well, there is only one way to put the reel in correctly...

It used to literally be true that the spool would only go in one way. Kodak used to make the camera spools with a round hole on one side. So you physically could not put the spool in backwards. I don't know why they stopped, this may have been back in the 60s.
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#20 Nick Mulder

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Posted 04 May 2007 - 12:28 AM

It used to literally be true that the spool would only go in one way. Kodak used to make the camera spools with a round hole on one side. So you physically could not put the spool in backwards. I don't know why they stopped, this may have been back in the 60s.

I had a few of those spools here - very annoying things to find in the darkroom once you've already wound film onto them ...

I filed them out to square so its all nice n breezy now
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