Jump to content


Photo

Research paper on Cinematography


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 Micah Kovacs

Micah Kovacs
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 29 posts
  • Student

Posted 29 April 2007 - 10:37 PM

I'm writing a paper about the whole "digital revolution" with video taking over film in the industry. I'm trying to examine both mediums and their limitations and then I will compare the different affects of these changes on cinematographers and independent filmmakers. And finally I will try to see whether the audience can tell the difference between video and film, and whether it even matters to them. I'll probably also look into some of the economic affects as well.

So to get to my point, my main issue is sources. I need good, solid research sources whether they be books, articles, or internet sites about anything concerning this revolution. I really appreciate any help I can get. I've scoured my local library but I haven't been able to dig up anything helpful or relevant.

First-person sources would be great too. If I could quote any of you guys on the affects you've seen I would be eternally grateful.
Thanks in advance,
Eric
  • 0

#2 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19765 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 29 April 2007 - 10:40 PM

Just dig up every magazine article that accompanies a major theatrical release that was shot digitally -- I'm sure that at some point in the interview with the director, the issue will be discussed. Just remember that anyone who is promoting their movie shot digitally is going to mainly say good things about the experience.
  • 0

#3 David Sweetman

David Sweetman
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 757 posts
  • Student

Posted 29 April 2007 - 11:11 PM

In the latest American Cinematographer, Bill Pope, ASC mentions Sam Raimi turned down the idea of shooting Spider-Man 3 digitally (May 2007, pp. 31-32). Also I think it was the previous issue (April I guess) that covered Zodiac. This may issue has an article on 28 Weeks Later, shot mostly on Super-16, whreas the original 28 Days Later (July 03) was shot on an xl1 (and, being a multi-million dollar production, for reasons other than budget. Plus I believe they spent a pretty penny on the camera dpt. anyway.)

I don't like those kind of catchphrase terms, but my observation is that digital hasn't brought so much of a revolution as it has a kind of growth. Maybe when every film is going through a DI, it would be correct to say digital in a broad sense has revolutionized the film industry, but that will come before film ceases to be used.
  • 0

#4 Douglas Hunter

Douglas Hunter
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 356 posts
  • Other
  • Los Angeles

Posted 30 April 2007 - 02:19 AM

In the well known art history journal OCTOBER issue #100 there was an article on digital video as a false revoultion. Which I think is a great term to use because it directly confronts our still very limited and modernist thinking about technological changes and notions of "progress" etc. be careful of using terms like "video taking over film". its not a good representation of our historical moment. Even films shot on film still depend on video in the post production work flow, and many video users want their video to look like film, most people call there videos "films". On this issue it's often easy to get bogged down in ideological debates and lose sight of how film and video are used to meet aesthetic and technical goals.

On a side note, I'm quite certain that many audience members can NOT tell the difference between video and film.
  • 0

#5 Xavier Plaza

Xavier Plaza
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 288 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Guayaquil - Ecuador

Posted 30 April 2007 - 09:49 AM

Hi Eric:

You can find information in International Cinematographers Guild this link http://www.cameragui...ology/index.htm section Digital Future especially search " An Evolution in Electronic Imaging: Digital's Destiny with a 24 Frame Rate By Max Bloom " , i suppouse this source is good and solid as you want...

Hope Helps


Xavier Plaza
Director of Photography
  • 0

#6 Mike Bove

Mike Bove
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 14 posts
  • Student
  • Chicago

Posted 30 April 2007 - 10:10 AM

It's funny, I just did the same paper recently. Mine was focused more on technical aspects, so I used a lot of text, but I did reference the web a lot, I suggest looking at the online American Cinematographer magazine if you don't have access to hard copies. I used the articles on Apocalypto and Collateral, just do a search for them.

Good luck!
  • 0

#7 Micah Kovacs

Micah Kovacs
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 29 posts
  • Student

Posted 30 April 2007 - 11:38 AM

Hi Eric:

You can find information in International Cinematographers Guild this link http://www.cameragui...ology/index.htm section Digital Future especially search " An Evolution in Electronic Imaging: Digital's Destiny with a 24 Frame Rate By Max Bloom " , i suppouse this source is good and solid as you want...

Hope Helps
Xavier Plaza
Director of Photography


thank you so much, one of the best sources that I've seen yet
  • 0

#8 Daniel Smith

Daniel Smith
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 791 posts
  • Other

Posted 30 April 2007 - 05:08 PM

Funnily enough, I did the same subject with my A-level coursework project. I got an A for it, however it was nothing special and I'm not sure it would be of any use to you, depending on what level you're doing.
(It was a powerpoint presentation, with a catalogue index with a list of information sources, along with an evaluation)
  • 0

#9 marieta fuertes

marieta fuertes

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • Camera Operator

Posted 30 April 2007 - 08:22 PM

check this one

www.clarkvision.com/imagedetail

in here you will find nice comparisons between film an celluloid, grain and pixel

marieta fuertes



I'm writing a paper about the whole "digital revolution" with video taking over film in the industry. I'm trying to examine both mediums and their limitations and then I will compare the different affects of these changes on cinematographers and independent filmmakers. And finally I will try to see whether the audience can tell the difference between video and film, and whether it even matters to them. I'll probably also look into some of the economic affects as well.

So to get to my point, my main issue is sources. I need good, solid research sources whether they be books, articles, or internet sites about anything concerning this revolution. I really appreciate any help I can get. I've scoured my local library but I haven't been able to dig up anything helpful or relevant.

First-person sources would be great too. If I could quote any of you guys on the affects you've seen I would be eternally grateful.
Thanks in advance,
Eric


  • 0


FJS International, LLC

Visual Products

Opal

Tai Audio

Aerial Filmworks

Paralinx LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

Willys Widgets

The Slider

Metropolis Post

CineLab

Abel Cine

rebotnix Technologies

CineTape

Technodolly

Wooden Camera

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Ritter Battery

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Glidecam

Willys Widgets

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Aerial Filmworks

Tai Audio

Ritter Battery

FJS International, LLC

Metropolis Post

rebotnix Technologies

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineLab

Paralinx LLC

Visual Products

Abel Cine

Rig Wheels Passport

Wooden Camera

Glidecam

CineTape

Technodolly

The Slider

Opal