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In-camera options


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#1 Dan McCormick

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Posted 30 April 2007 - 10:27 AM

Hi

I'm about to shoot a short student film on S16mm using an SRII. I am hoping for sun as it will not only look far nicer in the location but also mirrors the mood the Director wants.

What I have been trying to figure out though is if anything can be done in camera to make overcast skies look more interesting. I think the majority of the shots will have the protagonist's head above the horizon, so I can't use grads, and I also can't use any lights at the location.

Are there any contrast or colour enhancing filters (the matte box can hold 2) that could help, or any filters I don't know about that would be worth looking into. I am partly willing to treat the shoot as a test for anything that isn't too drastic.

For reference I am shooting on a ferry deck, a beach and a bay.

Thanks for the help

Dan McCormick
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 30 April 2007 - 10:52 AM

Since you are shooting in Super-16, why isn't post color-correction an option? You seem to be limited on your in-camera options for making overcast look sunny if you don't have lights. There aren't really contrast-adding filters. You could use the new higher-contrast, more saturated Fuji Vivid 160T for your overcast scenes, perhaps use negative fill to add more contrast. But otherwise, some of this is best played with in post to control skies, etc.
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#3 timHealy

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Posted 30 April 2007 - 04:37 PM

Although I have never done it, some still photographers fly a silk, net or some combination over their models head to reduce the exposure on the subject. By opening the f stop makes the background brighter.

or perhaps in combination with Davids recommendation.

Best

Tim
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#4 Dory Breaux DP

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Posted 01 May 2007 - 06:00 PM

You could use gradents the same way they did in Lonsome Dove and keep the subjects head just below where the color starts to change.
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#5 Adam Frisch FSF

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Posted 02 May 2007 - 03:02 AM

A blender (as Tony Brown calls them) - i.e. a grad - is still fine to use if the head is above the horizon as long as the grad doesn't get into the head. A soft edge grad could even be allowed to slightly nudge it. As mentioned - you cab stick a stop reducing net on a butterfly and have it behind the actor, but it normally only works on tighter shots and where you can throw it slightly out of focus.

Overcast days can be tricky if you have to feature a lot of sky. Especially when there's no shape in them at all - just a milky white eveness. Bit of a nightmare.
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