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#1 Chris Dingley1

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Posted 03 May 2007 - 03:16 PM

Hi, I really enjoy DP's that shoot for vivid colors, movies like big fish, garden state among others.

What techniques with lighting, film stock, color correcton are done to achieve this.
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#2 Nathan Milford

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Posted 03 May 2007 - 03:45 PM

Shoot colorful things.
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 03 May 2007 - 03:58 PM

"Garden State" was mostly shot on the Fuji 500D stock, which is not vivid at all.

"Big Fish" was shot on regular Kodak stocks and went through a D.I. to manipulate the colors, which were designed in the 50's era scheme of strong reds, etc., at least for the flashbacks.

There is a new Fuji Vivid 160T stock you should check out. Kodak Vision Premier is the most saturated print stock.

Overexposing negative a little helps give the image more snap, and thus more saturation. Polas help reduce glare, color enhancer filters can make reds pop.

A lot of this is art direction though.
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#4 Jon Rosenbloom

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Posted 03 May 2007 - 04:24 PM

Hey, do you remember the pre-DI movie "Heathers"? I remember that created a bit of a stir because of its hyper-saturated look.
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#5 Chris Dingley1

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Posted 03 May 2007 - 06:40 PM

See i understand that you can shoot interiors vivid by shooting colorfull things, but i will go ahead and assume that it is DI that mostly gives it the vivid for things like nature?
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#6 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 03 May 2007 - 07:01 PM

There are limits to how saturated you can make the color with normal color negative processes -- you could use Ektachome 100D (5285) color reversal, which is more saturated, but also a lot more contrasty, plus it's more expensive, as is the E6 processing, unless you cross-process it into a negative, but then it gets a bit bizarre-looking.

Color is enhanced by frontal lighting, so shooting colorful objects in frontal sunlight would look the most saturated outdoors.
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#7 Chris Dingley1

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Posted 03 May 2007 - 07:08 PM

thanks alot
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Broadcast Solutions Inc

FJS International, LLC

CineLab

Abel Cine

Technodolly

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineTape

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Ritter Battery

Glidecam

Willys Widgets

The Slider

Aerial Filmworks

Visual Products

Rig Wheels Passport

Opal

Metropolis Post