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Vision 500T


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#1 Matthew Buick

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Posted 06 May 2007 - 04:35 PM

Hello.

Does anyone know the correct f stop to expose Vision 500T at?

Best Regards - Matthew Buick :)
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#2 Joseph Winchester

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Posted 06 May 2007 - 04:51 PM

It depends on the light situation and the shutter speed.

Or are you asking something I am not getting?
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#3 Jason Maeda

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Posted 06 May 2007 - 04:55 PM

F5.6


and shoot lots and lots of rolls before viewing any footage.

jk :ph34r:
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#4 Matthew Buick

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Posted 06 May 2007 - 05:02 PM

Shutter speed: 180

Lens Speed: 1:1:8

Lighting Conditions: Very low, the lighint of a couple of 1:33:1 CRT TVs (one 14 inch, the other, 21 inch) and the lights from the extactor in my kitchen, 80 watts max.

Yeah, pretty low light.
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#5 Joseph Winchester

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Posted 06 May 2007 - 05:17 PM

Don't you have a light meter?
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#6 Matthew Buick

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Posted 06 May 2007 - 05:58 PM

Are you kidding!?!?! Do I look like I'm made of money?

I think there's one in my camera, though I'm dubious about it's quality.

:lol: :(
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#7 Jan Weis

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Posted 06 May 2007 - 06:20 PM

Are you kidding!?!?! Do I look like I'm made of money?

I think there's one in my camera, though I'm dubious about it's quality.

:lol: :(


Please before you do ANYTHING, buy a lightmeter or learn to use the one
in your camera, otherwise its just a guessing game
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#8 Matthew Buick

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Posted 06 May 2007 - 06:26 PM

How chear do they come?
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#9 Jan Weis

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Posted 06 May 2007 - 06:26 PM

Ok look, if you really cant afford a light meter, try this home made method:

Get a modern 35mm still camera, set the shutter speed to exactly the same in
your camera (or close enough), then set the ASA at 500, and now check what
f-stop you need to shoot your scene.
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#10 Jan Weis

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Posted 06 May 2007 - 06:28 PM

How chear do they come?


Not cheap at all, I payed 160 bucks for my digital sekonik one.

check ebay
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#11 Jan Weis

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Posted 06 May 2007 - 06:36 PM

Matthew,

The one of the points of film is to learn how to understand the relationship
between light, film sensitivity, and f-stops. Its hard to learn it but its pretty
logical. You'll learn how to paint with light, and show exactly what you
want to show, through a very painful and expensive process.

You obviously need to pick up a book and read as much as you can about
the process, because that is the only way you'll truly learn. Asking in this
forum is always a good idea, but try to learn it through reading books
rather than just asking one question after another, because that way
you'll learn a lot more and youll learn it a lot better.

Once you establish a healthy foundation of theory, put it in the practice,
not the other way around.

my two cents
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#12 Matthew Buick

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Posted 06 May 2007 - 06:36 PM

That's not too bad. I expected to pay about a grand. :)

Will a special meter be required for motion picture cameras?



Best Regards - Matthew Buick :)
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#13 Jan Weis

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Posted 06 May 2007 - 06:39 PM

That's not too bad. I expected to pay about a grand. :)

Will a special meter be required for motion picture cameras?
Best Regards - Matthew Buick :)



The only difference between cine light meter and stillphotography light meters
is shutterspeed, again something you should read about in a book...
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#14 Matthew Buick

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Posted 06 May 2007 - 06:46 PM

I've just found one that I like. It's a Sekonic L358.

It costs a fair bit, so it must be good. :)
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#15 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 06 May 2007 - 06:48 PM

Check for the Sekoinic L-358 (I think that's the model number). It's 'round 259 on bh's website. It has cine speeds. YOu set the ISO of the film (in this case 500), set it to the cine speed oyu're shooting at (normally 24fps), point the lumisphere (white thing) towards the camera lens from where the object you are filming is standing, and press the trigger button. iT will display a number of an Eu. The number is the Fstop to set your lens for. If it says EU it means you're under exposed/not enough light. add more light.
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#16 Matthew Buick

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Posted 06 May 2007 - 07:30 PM

It's about 180 (USD) on eBay.co.uk.

If my mum says she has the cash on her credit card I'll buy tomorrow night. :)
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#17 Nick Mulder

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Posted 06 May 2007 - 08:07 PM

Hello.

Does anyone know the correct f stop to expose Vision 500T at?

Best Regards - Matthew Buick :)


Jeez Matthew - In the past your posts have annoyed me somewhat, but of late you seem to have turned a page in the book of 'not being annoying' ...

But then, here we have this ...


A quick look at your posts will reveal that you are quite able to comment on all and sundry and yet you dont even know the most basic photographic principle in the relationship between shutter speed, aperture and film speed ???

You aren't able to search ?

phew...

Well, anyway - welcome to the world of non auto-exposure photography ! You'll learn lots, and gain a more integral understanding of the craft for sure - waiting to see some output soon ;)

As for non light meter situations you can go by a mostly succesful rule of thumb from the still world called the sunny sixteen rule ...

It goes like this:

Set your exposure to the reciprocal of your film speed - i.e. 1/500 sec

If its sunny set aperture to f16
cloudy f11
dark cloudy f8

a couple of problems:

Its an 'aperture priority' system when mostly cine is 'exposure priority' - so you have to adjust shutter angles or use ND to reverse engineer the rule.

It doesn't have an indoor version ...


As in the above example I suggested using a 1/500 exposure - with a 180deg shutter thats 250fps ... ~ten times faster than it usually needs to be ... You can soon see why using 500T is not going to be very useful outdoors
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#18 David Sweetman

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Posted 07 May 2007 - 12:26 AM

I'd advise just getting the cheapest working incident meter you can find, even analog if it works.

500T lit only with crt's, you'll be wide-open and probably still won't have enough light. You can find fixtures at a hardware store that will take 300-watt bulbs, snip one end off some short ungrounded extention cords and attatch them to the fixtures, then find a way to focus and control the light with a little ingenuity and by searching alleyways for material. 4 300w lights is 1.2 kilowatts total; combined with a room's practicals, you can get a decent stop with that, for under $40. Or gel them blue and motivate them from the screens, if that's what you're going for. But especially if you're on 500t in super-8, you want to give the neg enough light.
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#19 David Sweetman

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Posted 07 May 2007 - 12:56 AM

...and 180 (degrees) is the shutter angle, the shutter speed should be 1/48 of a second - since the shutter is spinning 24 times a second, the open area will be over the frame for half of that. That's important if you're translating a reading from a still camera or meter.
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#20 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 07 May 2007 - 02:04 AM

Do you need to see the image coming off of the 2 crt's or you are using them a "practical" light source.
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