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#1 Andrew White

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Posted 06 May 2007 - 11:20 PM

Hey everyone,

Looking to get some feedback on this updated version. Please, anything you got, lay it on me.

http://apwhite.zooms.../files/07_0.mov

Thanks,

Andrew
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#2 Andy_Alderslade

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Posted 07 May 2007 - 05:56 AM

Looking to get some feedback on this updated version. Please, anything you got, lay it on me.


Ah some magnificent stuff there - particularly liked the girls in the field, the black and white stuff and the romantic stuff at the end, particularly the bar scenes - which are brilliantly moody and actually very real (bar scenes are always very overlit.)

My only major critism is that you start on that handheld stuff, now I like handheld and I think that material is very strong still, but perhaps not as visually dynamic to captivate the viewer as say the girls in the field. Handheld is also a matter of taste too - so I would hold it till a little latter in the showreel when you've established yourself more.

Can you tell me what formats you are using?

Best of luck, Andy
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#3 Andrew White

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Posted 09 May 2007 - 08:57 PM

Ah some magnificent stuff there - particularly liked the girls in the field, the black and white stuff and the romantic stuff at the end, particularly the bar scenes - which are brilliantly moody and actually very real (bar scenes are always very overlit.)

My only major critism is that you start on that handheld stuff, now I like handheld and I think that material is very strong still, but perhaps not as visually dynamic to captivate the viewer as say the girls in the field. Handheld is also a matter of taste too - so I would hold it till a little latter in the showreel when you've established yourself more.

Can you tell me what formats you are using?

Best of luck, Andy



Thanks Andy fo responding. Apparently we Andrew's need to stick together. I agree that the handheld is risky, but it's so short that I figured I could get by with it there. There is 35mm and 16mm negative - the B&W is reversal 16.

Andrew
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#4 Andy_Alderslade

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Posted 13 May 2007 - 06:15 AM

Thanks Andy fo responding. Apparently we Andrew's need to stick together. I agree that the handheld is risky, but it's so short that I figured I could get by with it there. There is 35mm and 16mm negative - the B&W is reversal 16.

Andrew


Yea it is short but some of the stuff with the the girls in the field is so striking its best to grab people in the first few seconds, I know its difficult to change it now once you've spent so much time editing it together.

I'm really impressed that there is no big difference between you 35 and 16mm neg stuff, you've squeezed a very 'hi-def' look out of both that I associate with US shows shot on 35mm.

Best of luck,
Andy
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#5 Jon Rosenbloom

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Posted 18 May 2007 - 11:03 AM

Lots of beautiful footage. I would move the first section down the line.
What was the workflow like to get on the web w/ such high image quality?

Edited by Jon Rosenbloom, 18 May 2007 - 11:04 AM.

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#6 Andrew White

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Posted 19 May 2007 - 05:20 PM

Lots of beautiful footage. I would move the first section down the line.
What was the workflow like to get on the web w/ such high image quality?


Thanks for the suggestion, I'm working it out right now, I might just lose the hand held stuff. The work flow was pretty standard - film telecined to HDcam for some, digibeta for others, edited in FCP and then exported as a slighly compressed .mov.

Andrew
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#7 Chris Keth

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Posted 20 May 2007 - 05:31 PM

Thanks for the suggestion, I'm working it out right now, I might just lose the hand held stuff. The work flow was pretty standard - film telecined to HDcam for some, digibeta for others, edited in FCP and then exported as a slighly compressed .mov.

Andrew


With what codec?
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#8 Nate Downes

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Posted 20 May 2007 - 06:05 PM

Thanks for the suggestion, I'm working it out right now, I might just lose the hand held stuff. The work flow was pretty standard - film telecined to HDcam for some, digibeta for others, edited in FCP and then exported as a slighly compressed .mov.

Andrew


I would keep the handheld, as it is innovative looking, but I'd move it into the middle of the reel, and start of slower with the piece immediatelt after it. I'd put it in right before the bar piece, personally.

You know, I need to actually work on my reel. **emails producer to get the tape of the footage he shot on Phobia... last year**
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#9 Jamie Metzger

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Posted 02 June 2007 - 01:00 PM

You started your reel off with the weaker of the footage you have. You have some great looking stuff. I stopped watching halfway through, even though that's where the meat is. Think about the producer that has no time to watch your reel.

Put the "money shots" up front, to get your audience watching.

Loose the shot with the sunglasses taken off the woman, and the guy on the floor with the burger.
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#10 Bill Totolo

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Posted 02 June 2007 - 08:58 PM

Nicw work.

What cameras and lenses did you use.
Any filtration?
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#11 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 06 June 2007 - 08:14 PM

Nicw work.

What cameras and lenses did you use.
Any filtration?


I really felt the beginning of the video was the wide angle shot in the field with the yellow daffodil, as soon as I saw that shot my reaction was, that should be the first shot of the demo, and frankly, everything after that was pretty good too. I agree also that the beginning should be pushed back.

On a sidebar note, on my computer I was getting some jerkyness when I viewed your demo. Some things that I view on the internet are smooth, and then other things are jerky. In this instance the jerkiness seemed to be on the same frames. I'm curious if anyone else had any smoothness issues.
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#12 Andrew White

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Posted 11 June 2007 - 10:42 PM

Thanks everyone for the suggestions and comments. Really appreciated - I agree totally with changing the order and losing a few shots. Cameras were Arri SRIII, Arri 35 III, and Arri Bl 4. Lenses were mostly zeiss standard primes, and filtration was stuff like coral grads and polas and light diff here and there using bpm in the 1/8 to 1/2 range.

Andrew
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#13 andres victorero

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Posted 17 June 2007 - 05:19 AM

Hi, they are some amazing shots like the girls in the field and the int. bar, very good light.
I agree I leave some initial shots (int handheld) and I put it in the reelĀ“s middle.
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#14 Algis Kemezys

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Posted 08 July 2007 - 11:58 AM

Your really all around competent. The pacing and compostions keep you rooted. Nice work is it really hard to get?

see my 3 min. trailer at
http://exposure.cbc....s-movie-trailer
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#15 Sarah H.

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Posted 08 July 2007 - 12:32 PM

I would keep the handheld, as it is innovative looking, but I'd move it into the middle of the reel, and start of slower with the piece immediatelt after it. I'd put it in right before the bar piece, personally.



I totally agree. I like the handheld shots, but it would fit better right before the bar piece. Also, I really liked the shot at the bar when the drink is poured and then you begin to follow the drink, but as a critique in general, in order to keep the audience's eye, I feel like you should have kept the drink in the shot until you land on the man sitting with the wine glass... maybe there was something I was missing...

Overall, very nice job!
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Broadcast Solutions Inc

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CineLab

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS