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Ultraviolet soft focus?


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#1 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 07 May 2007 - 01:13 AM

I was watching Ultraviolet today, 'cus I basically like watching hot vampire babes kicking ass and Milla is one of my favorite hot vampire babes, anyway, I noticed when looking at hot Miss Jovovich's close-ups that she SEEMED to be in soft focus although I could see quite a bit of detail in her skin, which confused me a little. It seemed like the focus was softer towards the edge of her face, along the jaw line which made me wonder if there was an extremely shallow DOF being employed for some reason. I couldn't figure out why they would have done that. I know there was a TREMEDOUS amount of CG and Bluescreen and or Greenscreen in the film and then I thought is this some kind of computer manipulation to help blend the stylized anamation and live action together or was this just plan old glamour photography with diffusion to make Milla look as gorgous as possible? Which actually, in my opinion worked if that's what it was. Also I did watch this in full-screen version if that's important, Anybody know anything about this? B)

Edited by James Steven Beverly, 07 May 2007 - 01:17 AM.

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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 07 May 2007 - 01:30 AM

It was shot in HD as far as I know and apparently a gaussian blur-type diffusion was added in post to the movie, particularly on close-ups.

All diffusion, whether you use a net or a glass filter, basically overlays an out-of-focus image on a sharp image -- it doesn't simply throw the image out of focus. A guassian blur does the same thing digitally. You control the strength of the diffusion effect by how much the blurred image dominates over the sharp image that it is laid over, what percentage of the mix is soft or sharp.

Digital diffusion also tends to defocus noise and grain, unlike lens diffusion. Also, with digital diffusion, black areas can glow or halate just as much as bright areas can, because you are overlaying an out-of-focus black area over an in-focus black area.
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#3 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 07 May 2007 - 05:20 AM

Point of order.

A Gaussian blur is just a blur which diffuses every point into an area of Gaussian intensity distribution (a bell curve). It is the soft focus artifact produced by a theoretically perfect lens (and by no actual lens ever made).

If you want to do a partial comp back over the original image, that's a separate operation - a Gaussian blur does not imply that this is taking place.

But don't worry, lots of colorists don't know that either. Gah.

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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 07 May 2007 - 09:01 AM

If you want to do a partial comp back over the original image, that's a separate operation - a Gaussian blur does not imply that this is taking place.


Yes, but that takes even longer to say or write ("a gaussian blur partially comped over a sharp image") everytime you describe that type of diffusion. But you are correct.
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