Jump to content


Photo

Memory Light - Eternal Sunshine


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 Daniel Tan

Daniel Tan
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 43 posts

Posted 07 May 2007 - 02:12 AM

Hi all,

I'm shooting a short digital film using DVX100B and I'm trying to simulate the 'Memory Light' that Ellen Kuras did in Eternal Sunshine. Mine is for a very short scene, probably about 10-15 seconds.

I read an article in cinematography magazine and they mentioned something about using sodium vapor light because of the direction and focus. Does anyone know what kind of sodium vapor lights did they use? Can we get these off the shelf or rent them?

Of course I'm using DVX100B instead of film camera so there might be difference. Besides sodium vapor lights, does anyone know or tried anything else that produce the same kind of effects, especially for DVX100?

Please help or advise. Thank you. :)

Daniel Tan
  • 0

#2 Stuart Brereton

Stuart Brereton
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3065 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 07 May 2007 - 06:05 AM

Sodium Vapor lamps are discharge lamps with a very limited color rendition. They come in two types, Low Pressure, which has a highly saturated orange look, and High Pressure, which has a slightly pink/orange look.

There are many different gel combos which can simulate this look on tungsten lamps. A search in the archives should turn up some old threads where these have been discussed.
  • 0

#3 Shaun Joye

Shaun Joye
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 43 posts
  • Student

Posted 07 May 2007 - 10:34 AM

From what I remember it was a blueish light in the film and sodium vapors tend to be orangish. I remember reading somewhere that they used a par can right near the axis of the lens. Pars are very similar to car headlights. Although given that you're shooting video which will give a harsher look to begin with I don't think using the exact same light source is as important as finding something that will work for the look you want on the DVX.
  • 0

#4 Micah Kovacs

Micah Kovacs
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 29 posts
  • Student

Posted 08 May 2007 - 05:01 PM

From what I remember it was a blueish light in the film and sodium vapors tend to be orangish. I remember reading somewhere that they used a par can right near the axis of the lens. Pars are very similar to car headlights. Although given that you're shooting video which will give a harsher look to begin with I don't think using the exact same light source is as important as finding something that will work for the look you want on the DVX.

I thought it was a bluish light too
so you could use a gelled or hmi par (with a snoot maybe?)
  • 0

#5 Daniel Tan

Daniel Tan
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 43 posts

Posted 11 May 2007 - 02:39 AM

Thanks for the help. I will go ahead and do some tests and see what happens. From the article that I read, they did tried to use a snoot on a Par, I think.

I will post some images after the shoot is done.

Thanks again.

Daniel
  • 0


The Slider

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Rig Wheels Passport

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Ritter Battery

Visual Products

Abel Cine

Metropolis Post

Tai Audio

Glidecam

FJS International, LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Opal

rebotnix Technologies

Wooden Camera

Aerial Filmworks

Technodolly

Paralinx LLC

CineTape

Willys Widgets

CineLab

Abel Cine

Wooden Camera

Willys Widgets

CineTape

Rig Wheels Passport

Metropolis Post

Tai Audio

Technodolly

CineLab

Visual Products

Ritter Battery

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Aerial Filmworks

rebotnix Technologies

FJS International, LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Glidecam

Opal

Paralinx LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

The Slider