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Red Cast on my Footage, Don't know why...


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#1 John Travis

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Posted 08 May 2007 - 12:11 PM

I shot some test footage (using a Russian Kinor) on Kodak Vision 2. One 400ft roll of 250D and one 400ft roll of 500T. I shot exteriors at night with the 500T and some exteriors late in the day as the sun was going down with the 250D.

I sent the film to be processed and transfered to MiniDV tape so I could view it. It was processed normal and a straight unsupervised transfer to MiniDV tape was done.

When I got the tape back it there were alot of artifacts on it (is this normal, I know it's MiniDV so the quality will be poor).

But the real problem was the day footage shot on the 250D. It has a red cast throughout and I don't just mean a slight shift, I mean red seems to be the only color present.

Is this a problem with the way I shot it, the film, the Camera, or was it something that probably happened in telecine?

Any thoughts on this you could give would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

John
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#2 Thomas Smith

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Posted 08 May 2007 - 03:24 PM

I sent the film to be processed and transfered to MiniDV tape so I could view it. It was processed normal and a straight unsupervised transfer to MiniDV tape was done.


Maybe you got to much blue in your grey card, and the unsupervised transfer operator do his job set the grey card and cut all the blue out.
I think that could be the problem.
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#3 Chris Burke

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Posted 08 May 2007 - 03:30 PM

I shot some test footage (using a Russian Kinor) on Kodak Vision 2. One 400ft roll of 250D and one 400ft roll of 500T. I shot exteriors at night with the 500T and some exteriors late in the day as the sun was going down with the 250D.

I sent the film to be processed and transfered to MiniDV tape so I could view it. It was processed normal and a straight unsupervised transfer to MiniDV tape was done.

When I got the tape back it there were alot of artifacts on it (is this normal, I know it's MiniDV so the quality will be poor).

But the real problem was the day footage shot on the 250D. It has a red cast throughout and I don't just mean a slight shift, I mean red seems to be the only color present.

Is this a problem with the way I shot it, the film, the Camera, or was it something that probably happened in telecine?

Any thoughts on this you could give would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

John




In addition to the gray card, did you shoot a color chart? If so, check that on your miniDV tape. It sounds like something during the tk. Ask for a retransfer. did you snap any stills that you could show the colorist for further reference?

chris
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#4 John Travis

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Posted 08 May 2007 - 04:43 PM

In addition to the gray card, did you shoot a color chart? If so, check that on your miniDV tape. It sounds like something during the tk. Ask for a retransfer. did you snap any stills that you could show the colorist for further reference?

chris



That's the thing, I didn't shoot a color chart like I should have (especially since this was a test). Never thought about shooting stills before, but that's a good idea, thanks. I'll probably do that on future shoots.

I guess I just didn't realize the color could get that screwed up. But since the night footage came out fine, I'm not really worried about a problem with the camera.

How about the artifacting on the miniDV tape? Is that to be expected when transferring 35mm footage to miniDV?
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#5 Robert Houllahan

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Posted 08 May 2007 - 05:19 PM

How about the artifacting on the miniDV tape? Is that to be expected when transferring 35mm footage to miniDV?



No...there should be no heavy blocking or any other gross artifacts on the tape. I think you either got a bad tape or there is some compatibility issue with your Deck/Camera and the recorder at the Telecine house. Try another Cam/Deck to capture but if you cannot get a clean picture send it back for a re-transfer.

-Rob-
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#6 Chris Keth

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Posted 08 May 2007 - 07:10 PM

How red is it? Red enough it's a possibility you may have shot it through the base?
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#7 John Travis

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Posted 08 May 2007 - 11:04 PM

How red is it? Red enough it's a possibility you may have shot it through the base?



You mean had the emulsion side facing away from the shutter? Hopefully, I would be smart enough to catch that, but I guess I won't rule it out if I loaded the film too quickly and wasn't paying attention.

I didn't even know you could get an image with the film facing the wrong way. But if it's possible, maybe that's what I did, shoot....



No...there should be no heavy blocking or any other gross artifacts on the tape. I think you either got a bad tape or there is some compatibility issue with your Deck/Camera and the recorder at the Telecine house. Try another Cam/Deck to capture but if you cannot get a clean picture send it back for a re-transfer.

-Rob-



There are many shots that are underexposed. Would that cause problems with the transfer?
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#8 Dominic Case

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Posted 08 May 2007 - 11:36 PM

How red is it? Red enough it's a possibility you may have shot it through the base?

That was my first thought, too.

There are many shots that are underexposed.

That confirms the theory even more: shooting through the base, you'll lose a lot of the light in the backing layer. THe image comes out almost entirely red and black - lacking in sharpness, sometimes with a blotchy streaky effect . . . and back to front.

I didn't even know you could get an image with the film facing the wrong way.

Was the image on your miniDV back to front? If it was, that's definitely the answer. If it wasn't, it's still possibly the answer if the telecine people noticed the image was back to front and relaced the telecine to "fix" it. There may be no reason to suppose they know one side of a negative from the other. :(
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#9 Robert Houllahan

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Posted 08 May 2007 - 11:38 PM

There are many shots that are underexposed. Would that cause problems with the transfer?



Sure but you have to know whats happening here, underexposed film will make the colorist work at "digging" the image out of the emulsion or in a one light it will just be left dark. Basically you increase the sensitivity of the scanner and then up the gains on the channels to compensate for the lack of density in the film. This exposes the noise inherent in the telecine/color corrector system this noise can look like grain but it will not look like block compression artifacts because the whole Telecine/Color Corrector chain is uncompressed from Pickups to SDI out any compression happens in the VTR.

-Rob-
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#10 Patrick Cooper

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Posted 09 May 2007 - 12:09 AM

"Maybe you got to much blue in your grey card, and the unsupervised transfer operator do his job set the grey card and cut all the blue out."

If you were exposing the 250D by the setting sun as you say and you exposed the grey card under the same light, I would think that the colour of the light would be quite warm rather than blue.
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