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'FRACTURE'


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#1 Evan Winter

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Posted 09 May 2007 - 01:29 AM

Saw 'Fracture' tonight and was very impressed with the cinematography. There was a lot of use of color, movement, lenses, composition, and contrast. The film takes place in L.A. and it was very interesting to see L.A. shot like L.A. looks.

Most of the time DPs fight the hard and harsh sunlight of the city. 'Fracture' embraced the harsh light and used it almost like another character. The film was very much about light and dark narratively and they played this theme in the lighting as well. Also, it was quite cool to see such wide lenses used to frame the city so elegantly. I also enjoyed the copious use of color. The background was always awash with reds, blues, and greens.

Quite a few shots in the film could be considered art if taken as stills and this was done in a movie that is basically a trumped up courtroom drama. It was enlightening and a breath of fresh air to see a DP take a film that would typically be shot mundanely (ostensibly for realism) and make the visuals exciting.

Bravo Kramer Morgenthau, bravo.
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#2 Evan Winter

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Posted 11 May 2007 - 01:34 PM

Oh, and the story ain't bad either. :)
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#3 Dan Goldberg

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Posted 11 May 2007 - 01:50 PM

I've heard many a good thing about this film, but have yet to see it.

Do you happen to know any specs on it? Camera/film stock, production length etc?

Thanks!

Dan Goldberg..
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#4 Evan Winter

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Posted 11 May 2007 - 10:56 PM

Hi Dan,

Fracture was shot on Super 35mm film and went through a DI. It was composed for 2.35 and was directed by Gregory Hoblit (Primal Fear, Frequency) from a screenplay by Daniel Pyne and Glen Gers. The film was DP'ed by Kramer Morgenthau (Godsend, Mayor of Sunset Strip, Empire) and was cut by David Rosenbloom (The Break-Up, Friday Night Lights, The Recruit, Pay it Forward, Deep Impact). Unfortunately, I'm not sure what camera(s) it was shot on or what actual stocks. :(
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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 11 May 2007 - 11:36 PM

The new issue of ICG Magazine covered this movie (May 2007 issue).

Panavision Platinum and Millenium XL cameras, Primo primes and zooms, Kodak 5217 (200T), 5205 (250D), and 5218 (500T) stocks.
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#6 Evan Winter

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Posted 14 May 2007 - 08:39 PM

Thanks for the information David! I've been looking for those details. :)

Edited by Evan Winter, 14 May 2007 - 08:40 PM.

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#7 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 14 May 2007 - 10:39 PM

Thanks for the information David! I've been looking for those details. :)


I just saw it a few days ago -- I thought it looked great.

One thing not mentioned in the article was that light Classic Soft diffusion filters were used throughout.
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#8 Max Jacoby

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Posted 15 May 2007 - 03:11 AM

One thing not mentioned in the article was that light Classic Soft diffusion filters were used throughout.

How do you recognize it was these specific filters? Do they give telltale halos around lights?
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#9 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 15 May 2007 - 11:14 AM

How do you recognize it was these specific filters? Do they give telltale halos around lights?


Yes, and out of focus circles of light had that dot pattern in them.

It was pretty subtle for the most part -- probably the lightest grades. In fact, most of the time, you didn't see any halation, just that dot pattern in the circles. Nothing like how Kaminski uses them, except that shot of Hopkins washing his face, where the intense rim/backlight created that fringy halo from a Classic Soft. I liked it myself.
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#10 Martin Yernazian

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Posted 15 May 2007 - 01:48 PM

After watching 28 weeks later at an AMC theater, I was hooked by the S16 photography ( I just bought one hehe).
Anyhow we ( me and buddy) finish watching the movie and this security guy was been an ass and out of the rage that I had against him we sneak into 5 films that whole day, my view was I paying money to see films... escuse me I'm over paying money to see this film.... and I 'm going to be treated like poop.... hahaha no in my book.
Anyhow I saw Fracture and I was delighted to see great photography, great angles, great movement. I love the over exposure in a lot of teh cases, plus the rhythm of the film.... great from this guys really liked


I have to go bye guys

Best
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#11 Bruno Alzaga

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Posted 26 September 2007 - 07:13 PM

After watching 28 weeks later at an AMC theater, I was hooked by the S16 photography ( I just bought one hehe).
Anyhow we ( me and buddy) finish watching the movie and this security guy was been an ass and out of the rage that I had against him we sneak into 5 films that whole day, my view was I paying money to see films... escuse me I'm over paying money to see this film.... and I 'm going to be treated like poop.... hahaha no in my book.
Anyhow I saw Fracture and I was delighted to see great photography, great angles, great movement. I love the over exposure in a lot of teh cases, plus the rhythm of the film.... great from this guys really liked
I have to go bye guys

Best

I want to know the techique of the blue light use in the interior night of the car, when the lawyer arrives home. Is that a minikino bounced in the roof of the car?

Thans a lot!!!!!
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#12 Frank DiBugnara

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Posted 01 October 2007 - 01:31 PM

What stuck out for me was the use of color, expecially in places where you would never see color in reality. The parking garage was one example....Unmotivated pools of red light all over the background. For some reason it is easy to accept and enjoy all that color in the background.

On the rooftop night party scene, the simple practicals on the floor took the location up a notch.

The use of color in unusual places really helped turn what could have been a vanilla talking head film into something unique.
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#13 Oliver Ojeil

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Posted 01 October 2007 - 05:24 PM

I was stunned by the Fracture's cinematography. I loved that strong contrast look along with imagery bathed in vivid colors and remarkable highlights. Some shots if taken apart as a still can be treated as a painting I think. Beautiful depth and illuminations, and lot of moving 20th century style paintings I guess.
Bottom line, I really Love it!
Awesome Job by Mr. Morgenthau!
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Glidecam

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Broadcast Solutions Inc

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