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Step-Printing effect on Final Cut Pro?


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#1 Yee Cheung

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Posted 09 May 2007 - 01:58 PM

Hello all. I am doing a student film with a 16mm camera. I don't know anything about step-printing, but I would like to create that kind of motion blur effect like in the beginning sequence of "Chungking Express." Is there any way I can achieve that effect on Final Cut Pro? Should I film at a lower frame rate?

Any suggestions? I'm pretty new to these. Thank you.
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#2 Chris Keth

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Posted 09 May 2007 - 03:14 PM

Hello all. I am doing a student film with a 16mm camera. I don't know anything about step-printing, but I would like to create that kind of motion blur effect like in the beginning sequence of "Chungking Express." Is there any way I can achieve that effect on Final Cut Pro? Should I film at a lower frame rate?

Any suggestions? I'm pretty new to these. Thank you.


The basic idea is to shoot at a lower framerate and then print to a normal framerate. In the "old days" you would do cross-dissolves between "real" frames that are long enough to get you back up to 24 fps. An example would be to shoot at 8fps and then the frame progression would go like this:

1.real frame 1
2.70% real frame 1, 30% real frame 2
3.70% real frame 2, 30% real frame 1
4.real frame 2

et cetera. The percentages are just made up but it would be something like that. Now you could easily do that in final cut.


If you wanted to do it in a way involving interframe interpolation, I think a dedicated effects program would do the job better.
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#3 Yee Cheung

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Posted 09 May 2007 - 04:58 PM

The basic idea is to shoot at a lower framerate and then print to a normal framerate. In the "old days" you would do cross-dissolves between "real" frames that are long enough to get you back up to 24 fps. An example would be to shoot at 8fps and then the frame progression would go like this:

1.real frame 1
2.70% real frame 1, 30% real frame 2
3.70% real frame 2, 30% real frame 1
4.real frame 2

et cetera. The percentages are just made up but it would be something like that. Now you could easily do that in final cut.
If you wanted to do it in a way involving interframe interpolation, I think a dedicated effects program would do the job better.



How do you do it on final cut?
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#4 Michael Nash

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Posted 10 May 2007 - 11:14 PM

You definitely want to shoot at a lower frame rate, to get that motion blur. The opening scene looks about like 6fps. But step printing doesn't have to involve cross-dissolves -- that's only if you want to add more blurriness to the motion and kind of mask the "step" between repeated and new frames. The opening of C.E. is the simple repeating of frames, and you can see the abrupt jump in motion between steps.

In post, you want to slo-mo your footage the same percentage as the frame rate deviates from 24fps. In other words, 6fps would get slowed to 25 percent, or the clip duration multiplied by 4. In FCP, select the clip in the timeline, then Modify/Speed...

Of course since you have to telecine your film, you could simply transfer the undercranked material at the camera frame rate (essentially "step printing" in telecine). In other words, transfer at 6fps and let the telecine do the stepping.
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#5 Andres Pardo aka Gral Treegan

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Posted 11 May 2007 - 12:28 AM

Hi!

i try this fx you want with my k3 running at 5-6 fps, 1.9f and compensate the light with ND filters. dont know why really but in f1.9 the effect is more notorius.

after that if you want to have more motion blur you need to look for motion blur in the motion palet of the clip... in the canvas (in fcp). if its not enough for you look for a real motion blur effects for final or after.

bye!
Treegan
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#6 Yee Cheung

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Posted 11 May 2007 - 09:32 PM

Wow thank you for the tips, guys! I also have a question on the aperture, as I did something quite "deadly" the other day. I forgot to check my light meter under the correct settings when I had the high slide on (I was too tired I supposed, I had one actor and I was doing everything by myself). So my film was overexposed by 5 stops...

Anyways, that was not my question. My question is, if I am to film in 6fps, and I want the result to be slightly overexposed, does it mean that I should film add 2-3 stops, or how much should I expose my film to?
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