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Replicating a look


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#1 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 09 May 2007 - 06:45 PM

Hey everyone,
I recently shot some stills here on Kodak Elite Chrome 400ASA. It's a D film which I exposed under tungsten, giving it an amber/gold hue. A director i'm working with wants to recreate this look on S16mm color negative film as much in camera as possible. I was just wondering which, if any, color neg stock would best approximate this look.
The scenes were lit with a DP light (1K bounced off of the ceiling) as well as practicle incandescents @ about 100-200W each.
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#2 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 09 May 2007 - 09:22 PM

In such low light, you can easily do it with Kodak 7218, which is pretty high contrast like your photos. But if you're going for a tighter grain like those photos, 7217 would be a gooden as well. Just try and get a superspeed prime lens to be able to get enough exposure. It would help to overexpose by 1/2 to 2/3 stops to get those rich and dense blacks you're going for when you go to print or telecine.
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#3 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 10 May 2007 - 01:38 AM

Thanks for your prompt feedback. I'll surely shoot some tests with the two stocks you recommended.
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#4 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 10 May 2007 - 03:26 AM

If you want to replicate the warm look in camera, then shoot a daylight stock like Kodak 7205 (250 asa), Fuji 8663 (250asa) or Fuji 8692 (500asa).

Alternatively, you could shoot with a Tungsten stock, as Jonathan suggests, and add the warmth with filters (85B etc) or in post.
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#5 Nick Mulder

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Posted 10 May 2007 - 08:55 AM

Looks more direct yellow than 85 to me
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#6 Eric Steelberg ASC

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Posted 10 May 2007 - 09:29 AM

Really nice looking stills.

I'd suggest trying the Reala. It's a little grainier but it has more contrast than the tungsten negs.

What is the premise of the project you are going to be shooting? I'm curious what you're applying the this look to.
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#7 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 10 May 2007 - 10:39 AM

Really nice looking stills.

I'd suggest trying the Reala. It's a little grainier but it has more contrast than the tungsten negs.

What is the premise of the project you are going to be shooting? I'm curious what you're applying the this look to.


It's a warm night scene lit by candles only between a man and a woman in a bedroom. It's one of the few touching soft moments in the film before the man goes on a mild rampage because he thinks she's cheating on him.
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