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Angineux Optimo 28-76 Lightweight Zoom...and...


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#1 Ben Weinstein

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Posted 14 May 2007 - 01:41 AM

Normally I shoot with one camera. On an upcoming feature I'll have the benefit of a B camera. The film will be at least 75% hand held. The director wants to make the most of this by shooting different actors in the same scene simultaneously, which I must admit, sounds like a good idea, for the ability of the actors to play off eachother. In one scene, two soldiers sit side by side in the back of a transoprt vehicle, whispering, while they both look straight ahead. We plan to shoot it with two cameras, one on each actor, matching framings. I must consider the cuttability of the two lenses. I plan to use the new Lightweight Optimo 28-76 and/or the 15-40, I do not have the budget to double up on S4s nor get two exactly matching zooms so please consider the following:

Will a 28mm on the 15-40 match the 28mm of the 28-76? What about matching to an S4 prime? Will the 25mm on the 15-40 Optimo (nearly) match a 25mm S4? How do these new generation of Angineux Optimos intercut with the S4s? Im not too concerned with the color of the glass, as much as sharpness, as we will be doing a DI.

Next, is it possible to use the 2X extender on the 28-76? Any issues with 2X extenders and zooms?

Further, are the LW optimos good enough to shoot the whole damn feature? I could opt get only the longer primes...I have considered going this route but havent yet embarked on a feature without a set of primes in tow...These zooms boast no breathing, but do they have much distortion? How's the coating? Fall off focus on the edges?


Thank you in advance for any information.

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#2 Max Jacoby

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Posted 14 May 2007 - 03:26 AM

Since the 28-76mm and 15-40mm are both LW zooms by Angénieux I'd expect them to match.

But the thing with these lightweight zoom lenses is that they are only T2.6, which is quite slow and not very practical for nightscenes, etc...

Also to design such a light-weight zoom lenses one needs to make compromises elsewhere and besides speed, sharpness (especially wide open) and distortion are also likely to be affected. The easiest way to find out is to go to a rental house and pop them on the projector. That won't cost you anything and you'll get a very good idea how they compare to primes.

While you're at it, also check that the T-stop is constant throughout the zoom range. A friend had a problem with the 17-80mm Optimo, that darkened on the long end, but he is still not sure whether that is a design fault or if the lens was faulty.

Even if you go with these zoom lenses, it's still adviseable to carry some primes, since at the end of the day the extra speed might come in handy.

Another lens that is worth considering is the Cooke 15-40mm. That lens is a T2 and as such as fast as the primes. Obviously it's about twice as heavy as the small Optimo, but that's the price to pay for increased speed.

Zeiss also have a lightweight zoom lens, the 15.5-45mm. It is the same size and speed as the small Optimo, but it being Zeiss, I figure it might give slightly better performance.
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