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slo-mo 60fps with neon fixtures


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#1 Christophe Collette

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Posted 15 May 2007 - 11:36 AM

Hi everyone, I am shooting a music video tomorrow under neon fixtures, the director wants the whole thing at 60fps, I worry about flickers. I am shooting with an Aaton xtr prod. Althought the cam is crystal synch at all speeds, I am thinking it is a bit risky... Should I worry?

Thanks,

Christophe
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#2 Christophe Collette

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Posted 15 May 2007 - 05:34 PM

??? I really need a cue on this... thanks!

C
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 15 May 2007 - 05:36 PM

If you are shooting in a 60hz country like the U.S. and you are shooting at 60 fps crystal, you should be fine.
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#4 John Sprung

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Posted 15 May 2007 - 06:12 PM

Hi everyone, I am shooting a music video tomorrow under neon fixtures, the director wants the whole thing at 60fps, I worry about flickers. I am shooting with an Aaton xtr prod. Althought the cam is crystal synch at all speeds, I am thinking it is a bit risky... Should I worry?

Thanks,

Christophe

Neons produce light on both the positive and negative peaks of the sine wave. So, you'll have 120 light pulses per second. They're dark from the zero crossing until you reach the strike voltage, then brighten to the peak, and drop out again as you approach zero. With a 180 degree mirror shutter at 60 fps, you have a combination where the finder will show you just as much light as the film gets. Each time you turn on the camera, you'll get a different relationship between the neon and the shutter. Some takes may land on the peaks, others on the zero crossings.

Try a little test without film. Set something up so you can compare neon and incandescent light side by side. Do a few start/stops, and see if the relative brightness you see in the finder varies enough to be an issue. If it does, you might ask a sync box vendor -- the ones for shooting with a TV in the shot -- whether they can stabilize your phase relationship to the AC power.


-- J.S.
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#5 Christophe Collette

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Posted 15 May 2007 - 07:31 PM

Thanks guys! I am shooting in Canada, I should be fine then... The neons are not my may source of lighting, they are just way out in the background, if they induce a different amount of light each time I turn the camera on, it is fine with me, but if it flicks then I am in trouble. But it should be fine I guess!

Thanks for your answers, always helpful.


Christophe
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