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Aspect Ratio 2:40


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#1 Enrique Lombana

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Posted 16 May 2007 - 10:42 PM

Quick question: I see on the back of some dvd cases and on some movie specs the aspect ratio 2.40:1 , is this right? I thought most movies in this range is 2.35:1 ? Are there movies that are released now a days in the 2.40:1 aspect ratio? If yes, which ones?


Thanks for you time,
Enrique
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 17 May 2007 - 01:21 AM

Quick question: I see on the back of some dvd cases and on some movie specs the aspect ratio 2.40:1 , is this right? I thought most movies in this range is 2.35:1 ? Are there movies that are released now a days in the 2.40:1 aspect ratio? If yes, which ones?
Thanks for you time,
Enrique


Technically, 2.35 stopped being used in the early 1970's but the term keeps being used. The specs for the gate changed twice since then. Basically the anamorphic projector gate has been shortened in height to hide negative frameline splices better. Making the gate shorter had the effect of making the aspect ratio wider.

The projector gate should be .825" x .690" = 1.1956521 : 1, but with a 2X squeeze to the image. Unsqueezed, the aspect ratio becomes 2.3913042 : 1. Hence the rounding up to "2.40".

However, I've seen the older 2.35 gates being used, and screen masking changes the aspect ratio further. Same goes for video transfers; they can make the letterboxing 2.35 or 2.40 if they want.
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#3 Chris Keth

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Posted 17 May 2007 - 09:59 PM

However, I've seen the older 2.35 gates being used, and screen masking changes the aspect ratio further. Same goes for video transfers; they can make the letterboxing 2.35 or 2.40 if they want.


Do you ever find yourself framing for 2.35 instead of 2.40 for this reason, or is the instance of something important being that far to the sides rare enough you don't worry about it?
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 18 May 2007 - 01:08 AM

Actually the 2.40 gate is slightly shorter, not wider, so if you framed for 2.40 and a 2.35 gate was used instead, you'd just see closer to the edges of the framelines, maybe see more hairs in the gate, etc.

But some theaters chop off the sides a little with their screen masking & curtains, so you may have a 2.40 gate but the image on the screen is cropped on the sides by the physical screen itself. I once saw "Alien 3" in a second-run theater where they chopped all their scope movies down to 1.90 : 1 or so, almost to 1.85.
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#5 Enrique Lombana

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Posted 18 May 2007 - 10:13 AM

Thank you, Mr. Mullen.

That was exactly what I needed to know (and it was important).

All the best,
Enrique
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#6 Jason Debus

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Posted 18 May 2007 - 11:25 AM

But some theaters chop off the sides a little with their screen masking & curtains, so you may have a 2.40 gate but the image on the screen is cropped on the sides by the physical screen itself. I once saw "Alien 3" in a second-run theater where they chopped all their scope movies down to 1.90 : 1 or so, almost to 1.85.

I saw Spiderman 3 at an AMC and they do this as well. Going to Arclight and paying the extra $$$ to see proper composition is worth it if that's what you get at chain theaters!
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