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low light film stock question


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#1 Molly Corey

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Posted 17 May 2007 - 05:55 PM

I am shooting a short 16mm piece next week in a library. The lighting is very dim and of course a mix of flourecent and daylight. I am planning on shooting both black and white and color. But I am confused by what film to choose. I cannot alter or add any light so I can't help the levels there. What is the highest asa black and white stock in 16mm. It looks like kodak makes a 250d but nothing higher.

as for color i was thinking about using fuji 500d. i have gotten mixed reviews on it. I would really like the grains to be kept to a minimum.

At 24fps a camera is usually a 1/60 of a second right? Is there a way to get something out of a 250d film so that I wouldn't have to be wide open, loosing so much depth of field. Would that mean to push or pull the film and what would it do to the film, make it much grainier?

Thanks for any suggestions or answers.

Molly
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#2 Patrick Cooper

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Posted 17 May 2007 - 10:20 PM

A few 16mm cameras, like the Bolex and K3, expose each frame at or close to 1/60th when running at 24fps. The majority of 16mm cameras utilize 1/48th when running at this speed. In the world of super 8, there are some cameras that have unusually large shutter angles and these will allow in more light than usual. There are some 16mm cameras that do have variable shutters but I am not sure which, if any, have the capability of increasing the shutter angle. In 16mm, most people seem to use a variable shutter to close down the shutter angle rather than open it up. Even if you can increase the shutter angle, you would have to be careful of any fast movements by your subjects as this will cause motion blur. Though motion blur seems less noticeable in long shots. Another option would be running the camera at a slower speed to achieve a slower shutter speed but of course this will be useless if there is any movement in the frame, unless you want speeded up movement. The only other thing I can think of is using fast lenses.
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#3 Patrick Cooper

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Posted 17 May 2007 - 10:27 PM

Yes, pushing a film will lead to an increase in grain and contrast. However, how much contrastier and grainier it will become will depend on how many stops you push it, and the stock itself.
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#4 Patrick Cooper

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Posted 17 May 2007 - 11:06 PM

Oh and another thing. If you want to have a decent amount of depth of field as you say, stick mainly to wide angle and 'standard' lenses.
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#5 Xavier Plaza

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Posted 17 May 2007 - 11:54 PM

Molly i don't know your budget but shoot all using Fuji 500D... and then in post (grade) change to B&W... Whatever you wanna do, please first make test

hope helps
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#6 Xavier Plaza

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Posted 18 May 2007 - 12:04 AM

Molly i just read here in Film Stocks and Processing two subjets Kodak Vision 2 500T 7218 and Anton Corbijn / Control - Which Stock? maybe those help you to find your answers...

Check it & Good luck
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