Jump to content


Photo

35mm in US 60s / 70s TV shows


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 Patrick Cooper

Patrick Cooper
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 868 posts
  • Other

Posted 18 May 2007 - 12:33 AM

When shooting 35mm for the big screen, there seems to me two main choices - Super 35 and Anamorphic, in addition to various cropped sub formats like 3 perf and 4 perf etc. However, I'm wondering what 'format' of 35mm was used in US TV shows back in the 60s and 70s like MASH, Bewitched etc. Would this be regular 35mm (4x3)? It's not surprising that such US TV shows looked more finer grained than the BBC shows of the same period which were usually shot on 16mm (for exterior shooting.) However, I also notice that to my eyes, 1970s shows like MASH and Happy Days, do not have the same kind of clarity and sharpness as seen in big screen Hollywood movies of the same decade. So I'm guessing they used a smaller sized frame on the same width of film?
  • 0

#2 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19759 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 18 May 2007 - 01:00 AM

Old TV shows back then would have shot in 35mm Academy, not Full Aperture, but that's not going to make much of a difference in resolution, the width of an optical soundtrack. Some of the lack of clarity was partly due to the fact that they weren't transferred from the negative, but from low-con prints off of conformed negative, but they were still rather contrasty, plus you may be seeing an older transfer.

Also, a TV show would have been more likely to use zoom lenses back then (as now), and possibly push-process for difficult night stuff.

Plus some old shows used diffusion-type filters, which were popular in the 1970's, like Fogs and LowCons.

New transfers off of the original 35mm negatives of these old shows can look quite sharp and rich.
  • 0

#3 James Steven Beverly

James Steven Beverly
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4199 posts
  • Director
  • El Paso, Texas

Posted 18 May 2007 - 01:13 AM

Were they sill using Mitchells at that time or had they pretty much all gone to Panavisions?
  • 0

#4 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19759 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 18 May 2007 - 01:16 AM

Were they sill using Mitchells at that time or had they pretty much all gone to Panavisions?


A lot were still using the older 35mm cameras that the studios had bought (or made) for their camera departments, like Mitchell BNCR's. Fox had their own camera, I forgot the name. Some might have been using Panavision PSR's if they had the budget.
  • 0

#5 Leo Anthony Vale

Leo Anthony Vale
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2010 posts
  • Other
  • Pittsburgh PA

Posted 19 May 2007 - 01:31 PM

A lot were still using the older 35mm cameras that the studios had bought (or made) for their camera departments, like Mitchell BNCR's. Fox had their own camera, I forgot the name. Some might have been using Panavision PSR's if they had the budget.


Early 60s shows like 'Bewitched', 'Genie' and 'Star Trek' would be using rack over BNCs.
I've seen production stills from Fox's '12 O'Clock High' which show BNCs. Fox stopped using their studio camera in the mid 60s. 'Planet of the Apes' was one of the last movies to use them.
They might have been getting too old, couldn't be converted to reflex.

'MASH' had BNCRs. Late 60s would be BNCRs.
  • 0


Broadcast Solutions Inc

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

FJS International, LLC

Wooden Camera

Technodolly

Tai Audio

Aerial Filmworks

Visual Products

Paralinx LLC

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Rig Wheels Passport

Ritter Battery

CineLab

Willys Widgets

Metropolis Post

The Slider

CineTape

Opal

Glidecam

rebotnix Technologies

Abel Cine

CineTape

CineLab

Aerial Filmworks

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Visual Products

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Ritter Battery

Metropolis Post

Tai Audio

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

rebotnix Technologies

Rig Wheels Passport

Opal

Abel Cine

Willys Widgets

Paralinx LLC

Wooden Camera

The Slider

FJS International, LLC

Technodolly

Glidecam